Posts tagged urban

Bluebonnets — on a street corner in central Houston — *not* in a spot where you’d expect to see Texas wildflowers growing. What a great sight! 
The street corner serves as a METRO bus stop.
[Photo snapped by yours truly (mollyblock) on my trusty iPhone 5 on April 17, 2014, and posted on Flickr here.]

Bluebonnets — on a street corner in central Houston — *not* in a spot where you’d expect to see Texas wildflowers growing. What a great sight! 

The street corner serves as a METRO bus stop.

[Photo snapped by yours truly (mollyblock) on my trusty iPhone 5 on April 17, 2014, and posted on Flickr here.]

junkculture:

Bird’s eye view photographs of traffic cones by Peter Emerick…more

junkculture:

Bird’s eye view photographs of traffic cones by Peter Emerick…more

Via gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Via steveleathers:

For PARK(ing) Day, my company created an Urban Farmlet on SW 2nd Street in Portland (between Taylor and Yamhill). 

It’s only two parking spots, but it feels like a lot more. If you’re in the area, come by and check it out. Have some lemonade. Enjoy some space that you normally wouldn’t have the chance to.


Happy 2011 PARK(ing) Day, y’all. 

PARK(ing) Day is an annual, worldwide event that invites citizens everywhere to transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public good.

Click here to view a map of cities where residents have set up pop-up parks. 
See also: Earlier Gardens in Unexpected Places post here.

Today, in “things I love.”

Via gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Via steveleathers:

For PARK(ing) Day, my company created an Urban Farmlet on SW 2nd Street in Portland (between Taylor and Yamhill). 

It’s only two parking spots, but it feels like a lot more. If you’re in the area, come by and check it out. Have some lemonade. Enjoy some space that you normally wouldn’t have the chance to.

Happy 2011 PARK(ing) Day, y’all. 

PARK(ing) Day is an annual, worldwide event that invites citizens everywhere to transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public good.

Click here to view a map of cities where residents have set up pop-up parks. 

See also: Earlier Gardens in Unexpected Places post here.

Today, in “things I love.”

Via gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Plantbombing!

Yarnbombing — or the cozying up of the urban landscape with random acts of gorgeous knitting — has already been seen popping up in a number of cities. Now San Francisco-based urban knitter and guerilla gardeners Heather Powazek Champ and Derek Powazek have publicly come out with yarn bombing’s next evolution: planting low-maintenance species in beautifully hand-knitted yarn pockets all over their fair city.
Inspired after this year’s International Yarn Bombing Day, the husband and wife pair call their project “Plantbombing,” and it combines Heather’s love of “urban knitting” and Derek’s skill at gardening. Using yarn, a bit of soil, and some hardy plants, the result is a hands-off, smile-inducing work of art. 
For those of you who want to try making your own plant pockets, Heather’s site provides the instructions to get started.

(via Plantbombing: Colorful Yarn-Wrapped Plants Soften Up The City : TreeHugger)

Today, in “things I love.”

Via gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Plantbombing!

Yarnbombing — or the cozying up of the urban landscape with random acts of gorgeous knitting — has already been seen popping up in a number of cities. Now San Francisco-based urban knitter and guerilla gardeners Heather Powazek Champ and Derek Powazek have publicly come out with yarn bombing’s next evolution: planting low-maintenance species in beautifully hand-knitted yarn pockets all over their fair city.

Inspired after this year’s International Yarn Bombing Day, the husband and wife pair call their project “Plantbombing,” and it combines Heather’s love of “urban knitting” and Derek’s skill at gardening. Using yarn, a bit of soil, and some hardy plants, the result is a hands-off, smile-inducing work of art. 

For those of you who want to try making your own plant pockets, Heather’s site provides the instructions to get started.

(via Plantbombing: Colorful Yarn-Wrapped Plants Soften Up The City : TreeHugger)

Today, in “things I love.”

Via cmonstah:

My cover story in ARTnews magazine about abstract and conceptual street art is now online. Check it!

Via cmonstah:

My cover story in ARTnews magazine about abstract and conceptual street art is now online. Check it!

Via lettersfromhere:


For his ‘Buildings Made of Sky’ series, American artist Peter Wegner photographed the silhouettes of urban landscapes upside down, revealing imaginary structures in the space between the buildings.

Junkculture: Buildings Made of Sky

Via lettersfromhere:

For his ‘Buildings Made of Sky’ series, American artist Peter Wegner photographed the silhouettes of urban landscapes upside down, revealing imaginary structures in the space between the buildings.

Junkculture: Buildings Made of Sky

Project Storefronts promotes economic development

From the Yale Daily News: Project Storefronts, a pilot program of New Haven’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Economic Development Corporation, has filled empty storefronts with four arts-related businesses (selected from a pool of 50 applicants), stimulating economic development in an economically depressed neighborhood. The vacant space was made available for three months at no cost to the selected artists and organizations.

Sounds like a logical project. Other cities should look at it as a potential model for/component of their revitalization efforts.

PSA: PARK(ing) Day — “an annual, worldwide event that inspires city dwellers everywhere to  transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public  good” — is one month away.

PSA: PARK(ing) Day — “an annual, worldwide event that inspires city dwellers everywhere to transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public good” — is one month away.

Via (me on) unconsumption:

“A funny thing happened after Keiji Asakura suggested the creation of a vegetable garden in the middle of the concrete corridor and skyscraper canyon that is downtown Houston.
 
“It actually came to fruition — with a swiftness that stunned the landscape architect and the nonprofit group [Urban Harvest] that shared his vision.
“Now, a mere two months later, herbs, vegetables and flowers are flourishing on a bustling city street. A community has been forged among co-workers and strangers who once did little more than brush shoulders on crowded elevators. Skateboarders and street people have grown protective of the fledgling plants.
“And this experiment, which involves nonprofit groups, the city’s Sustainability Office and employees of the Department of Public Works and Engineering, has become living proof that urban gardens can take root in the unlikeliest of places.
“The ‘Downtown Houston Container Vegetable Garden Project’ is … part of a trend in cities across the country, where once-vacant lots, apartment building windowsills and rooftops are being turned into community gardens which help provide fresh produce for the gardeners, farmers markets, and for food banks serving the needy.
“We haven’t heard of any other city doing this the way we have,” said [the city’s new sustainability director Laura] Spanjian. “The goal is to show people that they can grow local vegetables anywhere. We want to be a model for other cities and other businesses.”
 “It adds greenery and beauty in an unexpected place,” said [Derrick] Neal [of the Public Works Department]. “This is what gardening is about — totally ordinary people doing extraordinary things.”
Full story: Urban Gardening Experiment Blossoms in Houston - ABC News
Other community garden/urban farming posts here, here, and here.

Via (me on) unconsumption:

“A funny thing happened after Keiji Asakura suggested the creation of a vegetable garden in the middle of the concrete corridor and skyscraper canyon that is downtown Houston.

“It actually came to fruition — with a swiftness that stunned the landscape architect and the nonprofit group [Urban Harvest] that shared his vision.

“Now, a mere two months later, herbs, vegetables and flowers are flourishing on a bustling city street. A community has been forged among co-workers and strangers who once did little more than brush shoulders on crowded elevators. Skateboarders and street people have grown protective of the fledgling plants.

“And this experiment, which involves nonprofit groups, the city’s Sustainability Office and employees of the Department of Public Works and Engineering, has become living proof that urban gardens can take root in the unlikeliest of places.

“The ‘Downtown Houston Container Vegetable Garden Project’ is … part of a trend in cities across the country, where once-vacant lots, apartment building windowsills and rooftops are being turned into community gardens which help provide fresh produce for the gardeners, farmers markets, and for food banks serving the needy.

“We haven’t heard of any other city doing this the way we have,” said [the city’s new sustainability director Laura] Spanjian. “The goal is to show people that they can grow local vegetables anywhere. We want to be a model for other cities and other businesses.”

 “It adds greenery and beauty in an unexpected place,” said [Derrick] Neal [of the Public Works Department]. “This is what gardening is about — totally ordinary people doing extraordinary things.”

Full story: Urban Gardening Experiment Blossoms in Houston - ABC News

Other community garden/urban farming posts herehere, and here.