Posts tagged stuff

thingsmagazine:

London Buses, a collection by Kate Farley, presented at Obsessionistas, a website about collections

Obsessionistas is a cool site. Have a collection (of whatever)? Submit stuff here. 

thingsmagazine:

London Buses, a collection by Kate Farley, presented at Obsessionistas, a website about collections

Obsessionistas is a cool site. Have a collection (of whatever)? Submit stuff here

The way human beings attribute significance to objects hasn’t changed since we began having objects,” he said, fishing around in his box. “Even if we don’t identify ourselves as collectors, we are collectors of things. And things are collectors of meaning in various ways.

If your house were burning, what would you take with you?

Via networkedculture:

A photo essay that examines the interplay of the practical, the valuable and the sentimental.

You ask yourself: Is this thing worth hauling 6,000 miles across an ocean and in to a new home? Is it providing that much meaning and value to my life? If not, why bother having it now?

Interesting thought, quoted by Core77 in this item on Tsh Oxenreider’s “Organized Simplicity: The Clutter-Free Approach to Intentional Living.” For Oxenreider, a big move (from Texas to the Middle East) was “a stake in the ground for us…. From that moment forward [we] became hyper-selective about what we allowed in our home.”

Here is the quoted essay.

Here is Oxenreider’s site.

(via unconsumption)

Reblogging my unconsumption post:

 
 
The appeal of banana stickers (and other things):
Colors magazine’s winter 2010-11 issue, titled “Collector,” “visits people who have amassed holdings of everything from Concorde memorabilia to banana stickers to used tea bags.” The collectors “see ordinary things in extraordinary ways.” Pictured above is Houstonian Becky Martz’s banana sticker collection. (via Colors on Collectors - NYTimes.com)
Related (also, a confession): When I was a child, I repurposed banana stickers, using them to decorate my school book covers (repurposed paper grocery bags, thanks to mom!). Several of my classmates did something similar. Anyone you know collect banana stickers?
See also Rob’s insightful New York Times magazine Consumed column on the design of banana stickers, a.k.a. minimal packaging.

Additional confession: My mother let me go out in public occasionally sporting banana stickers on the backs of my hands or on my forearms, tattoo-like. She was awesome. :)

Reblogging my unconsumption post:

The appeal of banana stickers (and other things):

Colors magazine’s winter 2010-11 issue, titled “Collector,” “visits people who have amassed holdings of everything from Concorde memorabilia to banana stickers to used tea bags.” The collectors “see ordinary things in extraordinary ways.” Pictured above is Houstonian Becky Martz’s banana sticker collection. (via Colors on Collectors - NYTimes.com)

Related (also, a confession): When I was a child, I repurposed banana stickers, using them to decorate my school book covers (repurposed paper grocery bags, thanks to mom!). Several of my classmates did something similar. Anyone you know collect banana stickers?

See also Rob’s insightful New York Times magazine Consumed column on the design of banana stickers, a.k.a. minimal packaging.

Additional confession: My mother let me go out in public occasionally sporting banana stickers on the backs of my hands or on my forearms, tattoo-like. She was awesome. :)