Posts tagged reuse

Missing today’s Houston Social Media Week #Instacrawl. Instead, I’m hanging out with great City of Houston staff and talented Houston-area students who are interested in learning more about recycling. We’re judging students’ work in using salvaged materials to decorate recycling carts. Love this one covered in plastic bottles and cardboard. Not a typical Saturday, but a good one!

Missing today’s Houston Social Media Week #Instacrawl. Instead, I’m hanging out with great City of Houston staff and talented Houston-area students who are interested in learning more about recycling. We’re judging students’ work in using salvaged materials to decorate recycling carts. Love this one covered in plastic bottles and cardboard. Not a typical Saturday, but a good one!

unconsumption:

Here’s another kitchen-related reuse idea: Use a small dresser as an island in the kitchen. It’s an easy way to increase your storage and work space.
(Via Small Place Style: Ideas for the Tiny Kitchen; spotted on Pinterest.)
Note: This one’s on wheels so it’s mobile. 

unconsumption:

Here’s another kitchen-related reuse idea: Use a small dresser as an island in the kitchen. It’s an easy way to increase your storage and work space.

(Via Small Place Style: Ideas for the Tiny Kitchen; spotted on Pinterest.)

Note: This one’s on wheels so it’s mobile. 

DIY project: Decorate a candle holder with sea glass.

Choose two glass vases or tumblers of the same height but different diameters. Place the smaller one inside the larger one; add a votive. Fill the space between the containers with clear or colored sea glass.

(via bhg.com)
Earlier posts on sea glass here.

DIY project: Decorate a candle holder with sea glass.

Choose two glass vases or tumblers of the same height but different diameters. Place the smaller one inside the larger one; add a votive. Fill the space between the containers with clear or colored sea glass.

(via bhg.com)

Earlier posts on sea glass here.

unconsumption:

Have you wrapped gifts in cloth, perhaps in scarves or other fabric items that are reusable? (It’s like giving the recipient a second gift!)

For some beautiful cloth-wrapping ideas, watch this how-to video demonstrating several furoshiki wrapping variations. 

For other furoshiki folding patterns, check out the diagram in the Unconsumption archive post here.

[The video (by RecycleNow) also may be viewed here. Thanks, Green Thing — another great find!]

File under: Things I love.

How-to: Make a “paper tree” in five easy steps

This project was inspired by two things: 1.) A neat “printed paper pine” item from Anthropologie, and 2.) my discovery, in the attic of my parents’ house, of an assortment of vintage sheet music — mainly trumpet and saxophone parts from the 1950s-1970s (that hadn’t been touched since the 1970s) when my father played in a band. 

Materials needed:

  • One chopstick
  • Something into which the chopstick can be anchored, like a scrap piece of wood, so the stick stands vertically (I upcycled an old plastic reel-to-reel tape spool as a base)
  • Several pages of printed sheet music, pages from a discarded book (or book you’ll no longer read), old holiday cards, or pages from magazines or catalogs
  • A piece of cardboard, roughly 1.5’x2’ in size 

Tools: 

  • Pinking shears, or something else that provides a decorative edge
  • Scissors
  • An ice pick, or other hole-punching device
  • Optional: Glue, small nail, hammer

Estimated time for completion: 

  • A couple of hours, though you probably can multi-task (read blogs, like I did, or watch TV) while working. 

Steps:

  1. Using pinking shears, or another cutting tool, cut the music (or other paper pieces) into squares. I cut my largest square approximately 5” x 5”, and smallest 1” x 1”. As I went along, I didn’t measure the pieces, but estimated the size based on that of the squares I’d just cut. For one tree, I used 40 paper squares. 
  2. Next, use scissors to cut the cardboard into small squares to add as spacers between the paper squares. The cardboard squares should be considerably smaller than the paper squares — that’ll help make the cardboard less visible. (I used a piece of recycled cardboard that held a case of cat food — it’s thinner and less rigid than some cardboard which made it easier to cut, I think.) Cut out the same number of cardboard squares as you have paper squares. 
  3. Poke holes in the center of the paper and cardboard squares. With an ice pick, I was able to punch holes through several squares at the same time. (Your mileage may vary.)
  4. Next, place your chopstick in whatever object you have handy to use as a base. You may want to nail or glue the chopstick into/onto your object. (I didn’t need to — my chopstick fits pretty snugly into my base.) 
  5. Now place the cardboard and paper squares onto the chopstick, pushing them down from the chopstick’s tapered end. Start with your largest square of cardboard, then add your largest piece of music on top of it. Continue stacking the cardboard and paper squares, keeping an eye on how your “tree” is shaping up. Hopefully, it’s a nice cone shape. 

As your layering of squares nears the top of the chopstick, stop at whatever point you want to. You could put a dot of glue on the topmost cardboard piece and paper square, to hold them in place. (I’d like to take the tree apart after the holidays — to store everything flat in a box — so I didn’t add glue.) Also, I left my chopstick top bare because I like the minimal look of it. You may want to “top” your tree with something.  

That’s it. Place your tree on a table, and enjoy!  

Note: This project carries a stamp of approval from Veto, my feline quality control officer.

Unconsumption: This week: Tiffany Threadgould repurposes our logo!

Via unconsumption:

We could not be more thrilled to announce the special team-up that we’ll be sharing with you this week! Tiffany Threadgould, of the heroic RePlayGround, will be unveiling some amazing Unconsumption-inspired creations on this site over the next few days, in conjunction with her new book

Via artgalleryofontario:

Mounir FatmiSave Manhattan 02, 2009 VHS tapes, glue, table Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist and Lombard-Freid Projects, New York
Click here to learn more.

Via artgalleryofontario:

Mounir Fatmi
Save Manhattan 02, 2009
VHS tapes, glue, table
Dimensions variable
Courtesy of the artist and Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Click here to learn more.

Via szymon:

magnificent book sculptures by Jonathan Callan

Jonathan Callan is another artist who makes good use of discarded books. (And wood screws.)
Take a few minutes to open the link above and scroll through images of his other works. Truly amazing.
Here’s an interview with Callan (in association with a February 2010 installation in Wisconsin for which area residents gathered some 3,000 books for his use) in which he talks about his work, process.

Via szymon:

magnificent book sculptures by Jonathan Callan

Jonathan Callan is another artist who makes good use of discarded books. (And wood screws.)

Take a few minutes to open the link above and scroll through images of his other works. Truly amazing.

Here’s an interview with Callan (in association with a February 2010 installation in Wisconsin for which area residents gathered some 3,000 books for his use) in which he talks about his work, process.

Reblogging my post from unconsumption:

problemsolver:

ninakix:

Elbphilharmonie is Herzog & de  Meuron’s new glass structure  atop a red brick warehouse built in 1963 by the late Hamburg architect  Werner Kallmorgen.
via dezeen


[This post is an atypical one in the Unconsumption mix … ]
The adaptive reuse of a formerly abandoned warehouse in Hamburg, Germany, strikes me as a prime example of civic unconsumption — at a sizeable scale. Kudos to the architects, engineers, and other project partners for finding an innovative way to preserve an existing building.
The mixed-use development features a public plaza, three performance spaces (including a 2,150-seat concert hall), a hotel, restaurants, condominiums, and space for parking.
The project, slated for completion in 2012, is a component of the master plan to redevelop and revitalize Hamburg’s HafenCity (inner city) area; it’s expected to draw thousands of visitors each year to the River Elbe waterfront.
Additional information (13 pages’ worth) here, and  recent travel-focused story from The New York Times.

From a performance perspective, the design of the concert hall is unique: its bowl-shaped configuration places the “stage” area — the orchestra and conductor — in the center of the audience.
So many reasons to like this project.

Reblogging my post from unconsumption:

problemsolver:

ninakix:

Elbphilharmonie is Herzog & de  Meuron’s new glass structure atop a red brick warehouse built in 1963 by the late Hamburg architect Werner Kallmorgen.

via dezeen

[This post is an atypical one in the Unconsumption mix … ]

The adaptive reuse of a formerly abandoned warehouse in Hamburg, Germany, strikes me as a prime example of civic unconsumption — at a sizeable scale. Kudos to the architects, engineers, and other project partners for finding an innovative way to preserve an existing building.

The mixed-use development features a public plaza, three performance spaces (including a 2,150-seat concert hall), a hotel, restaurants, condominiums, and space for parking.

The project, slated for completion in 2012, is a component of the master plan to redevelop and revitalize Hamburg’s HafenCity (inner city) area; it’s expected to draw thousands of visitors each year to the River Elbe waterfront.

Additional information (13 pages’ worth) here, and recent travel-focused story from The New York Times.

From a performance perspective, the design of the concert hall is unique: its bowl-shaped configuration places the “stage” area — the orchestra and conductor — in the center of the audience.

So many reasons to like this project.

Via unconsumption:

A Discarded Chair Finds Its Way Home Again - NYTimes.com
Here’s something to think about: Wouldn’t this chair’s “story” be a good one to record and share via a service/app (using QR Codes) such as Itizen, described by Rob at Murketing.com and here  on Unconsumption?!

Via unconsumption:

A Discarded Chair Finds Its Way Home Again - NYTimes.com

Here’s something to think about: Wouldn’t this chair’s “story” be a good one to record and share via a service/app (using QR Codes) such as Itizen, described by Rob at Murketing.com and here on Unconsumption?!

How do you keep 25,000 panes of glass out of the recycling stream? 
 Via unconsumption:

A whopping 96% of the Empire State Building’s 26,056 panes of glass will be reused in a $13-million energy retrofit (part of an overall $550-million renovation) of the iconic building that will “cut energy use by 38% and save about $4.4 million a year.” 
Instead of ordering 6,514 new windows, contractors are refurbishing the existing windows and improving their thermal resistance (and performing the work from inside the building).

“[Empire State Building owner Tony] Malkin says he’s saving about $2,300 per window and avoiding the environmental impact of trucking new windows from the factory and old ones to recycling.” 
“If you can retrofit the Empire State Building, you can retrofit anything.”

Read the rest of the USA Today story here, spotted on Twitter via Architectural Record, @ArchRecord [Thx, Laurie!]
The USA Today piece doesn’t mention LEED certification, but I’ve read elsewhere that when completed, the renovated Empire State Building is expected to qualify for LEED Existing Building Gold and an Energy Star rating of 90, placing it in the top 10 percent of energy-efficient buildings in the U.S. Quite impressive for a 79-year-old, 102-story building. Now if more building owners would invest in retrofits/upgrades …

How do you keep 25,000 panes of glass out of the recycling stream? 

 Via unconsumption:

A whopping 96% of the Empire State Building’s 26,056 panes of glass will be reused in a $13-million energy retrofit (part of an overall $550-million renovation) of the iconic building that will “cut energy use by 38% and save about $4.4 million a year.”

Instead of ordering 6,514 new windows, contractors are refurbishing the existing windows and improving their thermal resistance (and performing the work from inside the building).

“[Empire State Building owner Tony] Malkin says he’s saving about $2,300 per window and avoiding the environmental impact of trucking new windows from the factory and old ones to recycling.” 

“If you can retrofit the Empire State Building, you can retrofit anything.”

Read the rest of the USA Today story here, spotted on Twitter via Architectural Record, @ArchRecord [Thx, Laurie!]

The USA Today piece doesn’t mention LEED certification, but I’ve read elsewhere that when completed, the renovated Empire State Building is expected to qualify for LEED Existing Building Gold and an Energy Star rating of 90, placing it in the top 10 percent of energy-efficient buildings in the U.S. Quite impressive for a 79-year-old, 102-story building. Now if more building owners would invest in retrofits/upgrades …

RecycleMatch: Materials Market for a Sustainable Supply Chain, Zero Waste and Material Procurement

Via unconsumption:

“RecycleMatch is an Online Market for Transforming Commercial Waste Into Value. Our web based marketplace provides a solution to reduce costs and environmental impact by converting waste streams from one company into useful materials for another company.”

Via Metafilter, which says: “Want a 5,000 pound roll of used denim every week for free? No? How about 40,000 pounds of organic fruit and vegetable waste every day? Want to get rid of a few thousand wooden cable reels instead? RecycleMatch is betting that one company’s waste stream is a supply stream for some lucky manufacturer out there.”

(Based in Houston, y’all.)