Posts tagged repurposed

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art: 
"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 
The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.
(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

Auto-reblog: Because every day is Earth day.
Also, there are some really cool pieces associated with Sculpture by the Sea in Australia (link above). 
Also: This.

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art:

"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 

The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.

(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

Auto-reblog: Because every day is Earth day.

Also, there are some really cool pieces associated with Sculpture by the Sea in Australia (link above). 

Also: This.

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 
I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!
This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.
(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock) 
Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here. 

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 

I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!

This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.

(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock

Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

In landmark art preservation news: 

It’s hard to miss the 70-foot-tall blue saxophone as you drive down Richmond Avenue [in Houston].
Its name is Smokesax, and it has been at that location on 6025 Richmond for the past 20 years. But Wednesday, the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art, a local folk art organization [mentioned previously here], announced it is going to acquire the oversize horn, which is made out of car parts, oil field pipes and a surfboard, as well as an entire Volkswagen Beetle that forms the U-joint at its base.
The big brass was built by legendary Texas artist Bob Wade as a special installation for Billy Blues Bar & Grill. It was fully restored three years ago, and the current property owners, Kensinger Properties Ltd., said they wanted the Orange Show to ensure the piece would be preserved for future generations. 
The saxophone will be removed from its current location at 10 a.m. on Feb. 28. The process to remove the massive piece will take a full day. Then, Smokesax will begin its 13-mile journey from Richmond Avenue to Munger Street. Artist Bob Wade will be overseeing the entire removal and transportation. Once at the Orange Show, it will be housed in the organization’s warehouse until an exact location has been chosen for permanent display.

(via Orange Show Center for Visionary Art to acquire Smokesax - Houston Business Journal)

In landmark art preservation news: 

It’s hard to miss the 70-foot-tall blue saxophone as you drive down Richmond Avenue [in Houston].

Its name is Smokesax, and it has been at that location on 6025 Richmond for the past 20 years. But Wednesday, the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art, a local folk art organization [mentioned previously here], announced it is going to acquire the oversize horn, which is made out of car parts, oil field pipes and a surfboard, as well as an entire Volkswagen Beetle that forms the U-joint at its base.

The big brass was built by legendary Texas artist Bob Wade as a special installation for Billy Blues Bar & Grill. It was fully restored three years ago, and the current property owners, Kensinger Properties Ltd., said they wanted the Orange Show to ensure the piece would be preserved for future generations.

The saxophone will be removed from its current location at 10 a.m. on Feb. 28. The process to remove the massive piece will take a full day. Then, Smokesax will begin its 13-mile journey from Richmond Avenue to Munger Street. Artist Bob Wade will be overseeing the entire removal and transportation. Once at the Orange Show, it will be housed in the organization’s warehouse until an exact location has been chosen for permanent display.

(via Orange Show Center for Visionary Art to acquire Smokesax - Houston Business Journal)

Old Styrofoam packing peanuts = new garland for City of Houston’s “Holiday Trees: Artistically Upcycled” exhibit.

Old Styrofoam packing peanuts = new garland for City of Houston’s “Holiday Trees: Artistically Upcycled” exhibit.

unconsumption:

Happy Halloween and Day of the Dead!
Pictured: “Dead Media,” an installation that repurposes 497 VHS tapes. Created by friend of Unconsumption Noah Scalin (mentioned previously several times here), of the Skull-A-Day project. (photo via SkullADay here)
See also: Other videotape-related repurposing examples in earlier posts here.

unconsumption:

Happy Halloween and Day of the Dead!

Pictured: “Dead Media,” an installation that repurposes 497 VHS tapes. Created by friend of Unconsumption Noah Scalin (mentioned previously several times here), of the Skull-A-Day project. (photo via SkullADay here)

See also: Other videotape-related repurposing examples in earlier posts here.

Today: Cans filled with Campbell’s tomato soup.
Next month: After the soup’s consumed, the empty cans, with colorful labels still on them, will be repurposed as … art supply holders!
[If you haven’t heard about these specially designed labels, here’s a little info: Campbell Soup Co., in a promotion with Target stores and The Andy Warhol Foundation, packaged a batch of tomato soup in cans covered with limited-edition Andy Warhol-inspired Pop-art labels. The cans were made available this past weekend at Target store. (I read that some stores sold out hours after the cans went on sale.) The project commemorates the 50th anniversary of Warhol’s famed Campbell’s soup can work. A portion of revenue from the project will benefit the Warhol Foundation.] Now I have to admit that I don’t typically shop at Target, but I needed cat litter, and I’d read about the can promo; together, they gave me a reason to visit a nearby Target store! #Popartisforeveryone
(Taken with Instagram at Super Target)

Today: Cans filled with Campbell’s tomato soup.

Next month: After the soup’s consumed, the empty cans, with colorful labels still on them, will be repurposed as … art supply holders!

[If you haven’t heard about these specially designed labels, here’s a little info: Campbell Soup Co., in a promotion with Target stores and The Andy Warhol Foundation, packaged a batch of tomato soup in cans covered with limited-edition Andy Warhol-inspired Pop-art labels. The cans were made available this past weekend at Target store. (I read that some stores sold out hours after the cans went on sale.) The project commemorates the 50th anniversary of Warhol’s famed Campbell’s soup can work. A portion of revenue from the project will benefit the Warhol Foundation.] Now I have to admit that I don’t typically shop at Target, but I needed cat litter, and I’d read about the can promo; together, they gave me a reason to visit a nearby Target store! #Popartisforeveryone

(Taken with Instagram at Super Target)

unconsumption:

Dave Bowman, of Dearborn, Michigan-based Design Turnpike, turns vintage license plates into beautifully crafted pieces of art.
For a project like this 60” x 40” American flag, it can easily take Dave 40+ hours to find, prepare, and assemble the 40-50 steel license plates, which get cut and mounted onto a distressed wood base.
Check out photos of some of Dave’s other work on Design Turnpike’s site here, Facebook page here, and Etsy shop here.
Happy Fourth of July!

unconsumption:

Dave Bowman, of Dearborn, Michigan-based Design Turnpike, turns vintage license plates into beautifully crafted pieces of art.

For a project like this 60” x 40” American flag, it can easily take Dave 40+ hours to find, prepare, and assemble the 40-50 steel license plates, which get cut and mounted onto a distressed wood base.

Check out photos of some of Dave’s other work on Design Turnpike’s site here, Facebook page here, and Etsy shop here.

Happy Fourth of July!

unconsumption:

To add to our posts about libraries, other book-related matters, and wine-related repurposing, there’s this:
An obsolete card catalog repurposed as a minibar.
Need we say more?!
(photo via The Sugar Monster on Flickr)

Today, in “things I love.”

unconsumption:

To add to our posts about libraries, other book-related matters, and wine-related repurposing, there’s this:

An obsolete card catalog repurposed as a minibar.

Need we say more?!

(photo via The Sugar Monster on Flickr)

Today, in “things I love.”

I’ve long been a fan of artist Jean Shin; she’s turned discarded objects into really cool artwork. (We’ve featured some of her work on the Unconsumption Tumblr.) Here, I’m standing in front of one of her broken umbrella sculptures, in a private collection in Houston. (Taken with Instagram at Houston, Texas)

I’ve long been a fan of artist Jean Shin; she’s turned discarded objects into really cool artwork. (We’ve featured some of her work on the Unconsumption Tumblr.) Here, I’m standing in front of one of her broken umbrella sculptures, in a private collection in Houston. (Taken with Instagram at Houston, Texas)

architizer:

Street Furniture: weather-resistant drainage pipes wrapped around Hamburg’s existing infrastructure to provide public seating.

Now this is an innovative way to soften hardscapes. Interesting, from both repurposing and urban intervention standpoints. 

More creative new uses for old books:
Make table runners from the pages of unwanted books, e.g., books damaged beyond repair.
(via BHG)

More creative new uses for old books:

Make table runners from the pages of unwanted books, e.g., books damaged beyond repair.

(via BHG)