Posts tagged promotion

Via utnereader:

Musical obsession of the day: world’s longest marimba (sort of) played by an autonomous wooden ball (sort of). As Geoff Manaugh of BLDGBLOG puts it: “Landscape-scale musical instruments are an unfortunately under-explored typology. We need more wave organs and forest xylophones, more Aeolian harps and conspiratorially whistling infrastructures.”

Looks like this is a promotional piece for a (Japanese?) mobile phone brand, but still cool.

Via markcoatney:

upwardstrategy:

From New York Times piece “Ads That Let You Check In at Your Favorite Billboard” on Foursquare. Rethinking the Public Service Announcement.

Man, Gladwell’s gonna hate this….

Interesting campaign. It’s important to note that: a) it took place in San Francisco, where a high concentration of both foursquare users and public transit commuters exists; b) ad space was provided to Earthjustice at no cost (BART donation), helping to reduce campaign expenses and increase net revenue; and c) a darned cute animal was involved (visual appeal boost!).

Via markcoatney:

upwardstrategy:

From New York Times piece “Ads That Let You Check In at Your Favorite Billboard” on Foursquare. Rethinking the Public Service Announcement.

Man, Gladwell’s gonna hate this….

Interesting campaign. It’s important to note that: a) it took place in San Francisco, where a high concentration of both foursquare users and public transit commuters exists; b) ad space was provided to Earthjustice at no cost (BART donation), helping to reduce campaign expenses and increase net revenue; and c) a darned cute animal was involved (visual appeal boost!).

Via hydeordie:

The [free] new “Buildings” app for iPhones tells you about local architecture.
An excerpt from Archinect’s review:

"… After playing around with it for the last week, I’ve become hooked. I’m finding myself launching the app as I move around Los Angeles to check which buildings surround me. The database is a little sparse for this user’s city, at the moment, but the open-source nature of this well-constructed platform will inevitably help fill out the gaps quickly."


I find the user-generated-content aspect of the app, as described by the developer, to be quite interesting:
"Architects can upload their own work and other users can also upload  their own photos and videos and share with their online community via Facebook or Twitter. What this means is ANYBODY can contribute images/info to the site. (Read as Molly saying: Lots of opportunity for architectural firms’ self-promotion, and strong likelihood of erroneous information submitted by random persons.)

Via hydeordie:

The [free] new “Buildings” app for iPhones tells you about local architecture.

An excerpt from Archinect’s review:

"… After playing around with it for the last week, I’ve become hooked. I’m finding myself launching the app as I move around Los Angeles to check which buildings surround me. The database is a little sparse for this user’s city, at the moment, but the open-source nature of this well-constructed platform will inevitably help fill out the gaps quickly."

I find the user-generated-content aspect of the app, as described by the developer, to be quite interesting:

"Architects can upload their own work and other users can also upload their own photos and videos and share with their online community via Facebook or Twitter.

What this means is ANYBODY can contribute images/info to the site. (Read as Molly saying: Lots of opportunity for architectural firms’ self-promotion, and strong likelihood of erroneous information submitted by random persons.)

Oil Spill Donations Are Small, but Some Companies Step Up -- NYTimes.com

"Now Pepsi is donating $1.3 million through its Pepsi Refresh Project, which uses a Web site, refresheverything.com, to determine grant winners by popular vote. That sum is in addition to $20 million that Pepsi has vowed to give away in 2010 in the cause marketing effort, the term for collaborating with nonprofit organizations to bolster both charities and the reputations of companies.

Related: See "Funding should not be a popularity contest," with links to this post and others.

Watch [video]: One of @OldSpice guy’s many responses to tweets, Facebook and YouTube requests, etc., this one to librarian @wawoodworth, in defense of libraries and the importance of the written word.

Read [story]: From ReadWriteWeb: How the Old Spice Videos Are Being Made

The story within the story of the Old Spice video mill, churning out content since yesterday morning.

[hat tip to @thebrandbuilder]

Kinda glad I saw this — @CocaCola #WorldCup packaging

Kinda glad I saw this — @CocaCola #WorldCup packaging

Unilever Ice Cream Machine Detects Emotion and Shares Happy

whatconsumesme:

[Yesterday] at Cannes [Lions ad fest], Unilever revealed an ice cream vending machine for the digital age.  Branded “Share Happy,” it is able to sense when people are near. Using facial recognition…

 

”[…] it can determine age, gender, and emotion. The machine uses an interactive "smile-o-meter" to rate smiles; those with a big enough smile are rewarded with free ice cream.

What is also worth noting is the ability for users to share pictures on Facebook via built-in 3G.” (Related: Diesel’s social kiosk encourages sharing of images on Facebook.)

tigs:

The Slide (via myvolkswagen)

FUN. It’s a theory. 

Related fun: VW’s 2009 piano staircase promo

Today’s diversion — three New York Philharmonic promotional videos — comes from Greg Sandow, classical music professional (critic, consultant, composer, specialist in the future of classical music), who says: 

I’m wild — really, truly, happily wild — about three videos he [Music Director Alan Gilbert] and the New York Philharmonic made, to publicize his performances (starting tonight) of Ligeti’s Le grand macabre. He hangs out with Death. They eat ice cream. They talk about the Rite of Spring (Death wearily puts up with a story he’s heard a thousand times). They play Guitar Hero. Death — shrouded in black, speaking some scabrous language I wouldn’t dare identify — is unforgettable. Alan is game, cheerful, and lots of fun as Death’s straight man.

If everyone in classical music put out material like this, the field might be reborn tomorrow. And the Philharmonic is selling lots of single tickets to Le grand macabre, so they’re clearly doing something right. What role the videos play in that would be fascinating to know … .

Marketing brilliance.

[Greg’s blog at ArtsJournal]

Fun! 

Piano staircase: A component of Volkswagen’s ’fun' initiative — changing behavior through fun: http://thefuntheory.com       

Would this encourage you to take the stairs?