Posts tagged nonprofit

Via go:

We don’t think we’ll find anything more inspiring on the Internet today. This project is incredible.

reblogged via curiositycounts:

Underheard in New York – lovely project gives New York’s homeless a voice via social technology

Survey Shows Overall Giving During 2010 Holiday Season to Exceed $48 Billion as 74 Percent of US Adults Plan to Give | Convio

Online giving alone is estimated to account for more than $6 billion, an increase of more than 30 percent from the same period in 2009.

Encouraging news for the non-profit sector.

Via funnyordie:

Judd Apatow PSA

Jerry Seinfeld, Lindsay Lohan, Ben Stiller, Tracy Morgan and many more stars band together for AJWS.org.

Americans for the Arts names top 10 companies that support the arts

Via hydeordie:

•       Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.
•       Capital Bank, Raleigh, N.C.
•       Con Edison, New York
•       Conoco Phillips, Houston
•       Devon Energy Corp., Oklahoma City
•       Halifax EMC, Enfield, N.C.
•       M.C. Ginsberg Jewelers and Objects of Art, Iowa City, Iowa
•       Northeast Utilities, Hartford, Conn.
•       Portland General Electric, Portland, Oregon
•       Strata-G Communications, Cincinnati

Via markcoatney:

upwardstrategy:

From New York Times piece “Ads That Let You Check In at Your Favorite Billboard” on Foursquare. Rethinking the Public Service Announcement.

Man, Gladwell’s gonna hate this….

Interesting campaign. It’s important to note that: a) it took place in San Francisco, where a high concentration of both foursquare users and public transit commuters exists; b) ad space was provided to Earthjustice at no cost (BART donation), helping to reduce campaign expenses and increase net revenue; and c) a darned cute animal was involved (visual appeal boost!).

Via markcoatney:

upwardstrategy:

From New York Times piece “Ads That Let You Check In at Your Favorite Billboard” on Foursquare. Rethinking the Public Service Announcement.

Man, Gladwell’s gonna hate this….

Interesting campaign. It’s important to note that: a) it took place in San Francisco, where a high concentration of both foursquare users and public transit commuters exists; b) ad space was provided to Earthjustice at no cost (BART donation), helping to reduce campaign expenses and increase net revenue; and c) a darned cute animal was involved (visual appeal boost!).

Objects With Back Stories - NYTimes.com

This is a great NYT Magazine “Consumed” column by Rob Walker, and worth a read, even if you don’t find the thing-story subject as intriguing as I do.

The longer I think about it, the more I want to see such barcoding technology adopted by performing arts groups and other organizations, e.g., in the tagging (by building managers) of seats in concert halls, theaters, and other venues. Audience members could, over time, add their stories to their seats’ tags, recording their reactions to performances and/or information about other aspects of their experiences, leaving, in effect, a digital legacy that connects them to fellow patrons, the performers, the arts organization(s). The general idea is the creation of recorded stories, layers of experiential kinds of anecdotes.

Also, if, say, I were to make a financial gift that helped support the installation of a seat in the concert hall, or bench in my favorite park, I — the donor — could record digitally what inspired me to make such a gift. Many gifts of this nature are recognized with the placement of a plaque on the funded item; the use of coded tags would complement the plaque thing. If I record my “story” on my object’s tag, it’s likely that I (donor Molly) will be linked even more deeply to both the object and the non-profit entity that oversees it (think donor relationship-building opportunities here). Perhaps that part of the park is my favorite people-watching spot, or maybe my mother was a master gardener, and I made the gift in her honor or memory — anyway, you get the story-legacy-sharing picture.

So, thanks to Rob’s influence, I’ve uploaded over the past month two — count ‘em, two — items (and their stories!) to Itizen.com. (The two stories can be accessed via the Itizen Web site or by scanning the two QR-coded tags.) This post about the the second object and story contains a link to the first one, along with other QR Code-related info.

I’m now giving some thought to uploading to Itizen a third item. Stay tuned.

Who Gives, Why Do They Give, How Do They Give to Nonprofits?

This news release summarizes findings from Russ Reid’s “Heart of the Donor” study of donor motivation and behavior. Some good statistics here, especially regarding giving in response to the Haiti disaster. Other information, such as, “if the goal of a nonprofit is to effectively target today’s best donors, then they should focus significant and smart attention on the donors giving the most money – seniors and boomers,” reinforces fundamental fund-raising practices.

Russ Reid’s report, unveiled and discussed today at the Direct Marketing Association Nonprofit Federation conference in NYC, can be obtained at http://heartofthedonor.com.

[hat tip to The Chronicle of Philanthropy (@Philanthropy) and Raymund Flandez (@raymundf23)]

Nonprofit Groups Set Pace in Use of Social Media -- from The Chronicle of Philanthropy

A new study shows that the nonprofit world is more active than other types of organizations in adopting social media, according to the Society for New Communications Research.

The report, by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and Financial Insite, a Seattle research firm, found that 97 percent of the biggest U.S. charities use social media, a higher rate than comparable businesses and academic institutions.

Ninety-three percent of the surveyed nonprofit groups maintain a Facebook profile, 87 percent use Twitter, and 65 percent have blogs.

The report can be downloaded from: http://www.umassd.edu/cmr/studiesresearch

Reblogging my unconsumption post:

“RememberMe” Uses Digital Clothing Tags to Record a Garment’s History | Ecouterre
Additional information: http://www.talesofthings.com
Similar services / apps for the recording and sharing of objects’ stories:  http://www.stickybits.com; http://itizen.com
Such services have great potential among resellers, such as Goodwill, Salvation Army, and other thrift outlets.
Supplemental QR Code reading: Rob Walker’s prescient March 2008 New York Times Consumed column and Mashable’s “mainstream” July 20, 2010 post

Reblogging my unconsumption post:

“RememberMe” Uses Digital Clothing Tags to Record a Garment’s History | Ecouterre

Additional information: http://www.talesofthings.com

Similar services / apps for the recording and sharing of objects’ stories:  http://www.stickybits.comhttp://itizen.com

Such services have great potential among resellers, such as Goodwill, Salvation Army, and other thrift outlets.

Supplemental QR Code reading: Rob Walker’s prescient March 2008 New York Times Consumed column and Mashable’s “mainstream” July 20, 2010 post

Great story from NPR

Nonprofits Find Social Media Present New Challenges

By Pam Fessler  April 20, 2010

Charities are always looking for new ways to raise funds, and for some, reaching out electronically with social media tools like Twitter and Facebook is a perfect match.

For example, the American Red Cross’ successful text-messaging campaign raised tens of millions of dollars for Haiti. It spurred charities’ interest in the use of social media, but nonprofits are finding that some of these new fundraising methods need to be handled with care.

Northern Virginia Family Service, a relatively small nonprofit in Virginia that helps needy families, participated in a new Pepsi Refresh contest, hoping to receive some of the $20 million Pepsi is giving away this year to nonprofits and individuals that win the most votes online for their charitable proposals.

The group wanted to win $50,000 so it could buy a much-needed walk-in freezer and refrigerator for its food pantry. It has used Facebook and Twitter as well as an updated Web site and a YouTube video to win support.

The competition has been fierce.

One night late last month, Graham Marsden, the group’s communications and marketing specialist, was glued to his home computer screen, checking out the contest results. The group had to be among the top 10 vote-getters to win, and it had been lately. But with a midnight deadline looming, it was just shy of making it on the winning list.

"Two hours left. We’ve got to get into 10th place," Marsden said, as he refreshed the screen. "And we’re still in 11th."

Marsden decided to make a last-minute appeal for votes. He typed a reply to the latest Twitter posting by someone recruited by Pepsi to blog about the contest. Marsden didn’t expect the blogger to vote for his group but said he hoped some of her many Twitter followers might.

"We’re in 11th place, please help," he typed, attaching a link to the nonprofit’s contest site.

Fundraising In 2010

This is what fundraising 2010 has come to. Marsden and his co-workers spent much of the past month trying to build a network of online support, encouraging people to vote for them daily and to get their friends to vote, too.

And they almost won in February, coming in 13th among hundreds of groups nationwide.

But Marsden acknowledged it has been a big culture shift for an organization that generally sends out one or two e-mails a month to supporters. Now, the group was contacting them three, four and five times a day online, asking them to vote.

So, no matter what happened in the next two hours, Northern Virginia Family Service had decided one thing: It wouldn’t participate in the monthly contest again in April. It wanted to take a break.

"We were worried about voter fatigue," said Mary Agee, the group’s president and CEO. She acknowledged that she doesn’t really understand all this new social media stuff, but she says she does realize how important it is if her nonprofit wants to expand its base of support.

But Agee prefers to deal with donors face to face and was worried about bugging people a little too much online.

"You’re not sure how they’re receiving these messages about, ‘Please don’t forget to vote, we need your vote,’ over and over and over again," Agee said. "We might have that backfire on us, where people will be so turned off to Northern Virginia Family Service that, ‘See if I ever do anything for them again.’ "

And that’s the struggle, as nonprofits try to figure out how best to use social media: How can they turn fleeting, online contacts into the long-term relationships charities need to survive?

'It's Like Treating Your Donors Like ATM Machines'

Beth Kanter, who writes a blog on social media and nonprofits, has some concerns about the increasingly popular vote-for-me charity contests.

"It promotes kind of this transactional relationship between you and your network, even if you’re getting new people in because friends are asking friends," Kanter says. "It’s like treating your donors like ATM machines. You only go to them when you need a withdrawal."

She says donors have to be cultivated over time and engaged in what a nonprofit does. She also questions whether such contests reward the best vote-getters rather than the best charities.

Still, Kanter says, social media are a good way to tap into young people who are more likely to stumble upon a charitable cause online than they are to respond to a more traditional appeal.

An E-Mail Break

Back at Graham Marsden’s house, it was almost midnight. “This is my final appeal, I’m tired,” he typed on his Facebook page.

A few minutes later, Marsden refreshed the contest results site one last time.

"It appears that we did not finish in the top 10," he said. "Looks like our submission was one spot out of the winning territory."

Northern Virginia Family Service got no money because it ended up in 11th place. But it did create a lot of buzz in the community and made hundreds of online contacts. Agee was pleased.

"The one thing I’ve learned from this with the social media is we touched so many more people through this vehicle than we could have ever done through your typical send-out-a-letter or send-out-a-bunch-of-e-mails," she said.

But now, she added, it’s time to give their supporters a well-deserved rest and for her group to figure out how to turn all these newfound friends into long-term supporters who will write checks and volunteer their time.