Posts tagged news

Good food news: 
Texas Monthly Hires Full-Time Barbecue Editor - NYTimes.com

Most important, he [Daniel Vaughn, who has eaten at more than 600 barbecue places since 2007] had just decided to take a sizable pay cut and quit his job as an architect at a respected Dallas firm to devote all of his time and gastrological energy to writing about Texas barbecue.

Good food news: 

Texas Monthly Hires Full-Time Barbecue Editor - NYTimes.com

Most important, he [Daniel Vaughn, who has eaten at more than 600 barbecue places since 2007] had just decided to take a sizable pay cut and quit his job as an architect at a respected Dallas firm to devote all of his time and gastrological energy to writing about Texas barbecue.

buzzfeedandrew:

A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken. (AP)

Yikes. Just yikes.
[Another AP cab shot and other AP photos (and story) here.]

buzzfeedandrew:

A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken. (AP)

Yikes. Just yikes.

[Another AP cab shot and other AP photos (and story) here.]

2012 commencement programs for the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin include an unfortunate typo:

Susan Binford, assistant dean for communications at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, says the “pubic” typo was spotted after the programs were distributed at Saturday’s commencement exercises.
“Obviously, we are mortified. It’s beyond embarrassing.” The program went through “lots of layers of approval” without any[one] catching the error.

More, including apology tweets and dean’s statement: That ‘Pubic’ problem – again! | JIMROMENESKO.COM

2012 commencement programs for the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin include an unfortunate typo:

Susan Binford, assistant dean for communications at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, says the “pubic” typo was spotted after the programs were distributed at Saturday’s commencement exercises.

“Obviously, we are mortified. It’s beyond embarrassing.” The program went through “lots of layers of approval” without any[one] catching the error.

More, including apology tweets and dean’s statement: That ‘Pubic’ problem – again! | JIMROMENESKO.COM

newsweek:

Tweets from kids trying to use Wikipedia for their homework—and failing. SOPA! 
[h/t gangster curator Katie Notopoulos]

Wikipedia’s SOPA protest message here.

newsweek:

Tweets from kids trying to use Wikipedia for their homework—and failing. SOPA! 

[h/t gangster curator Katie Notopoulos]

Wikipedia’s SOPA protest message here.

New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com

The final movement of Mahler’s Ninth Symphony is a slow rumination on mortality, with quiet sections played by strings alone.
During the New York Philharmonic’s performance Tuesday night, it was interrupted by an iPhone.
The jarring ringtone—the device’s “Marimba” sound, which simulates the mallet instrument—intruded in the middle of the movement, emanating from the first row at Avery Fisher Hall.
When the phone wasn’t immediately hushed, audience members shook their heads. It continued to chime, and music director Alan Gilbert turned his head sharply to the left, signaling his displeasure.
Minutes passed. Each time the orchestra reached a quiet section, the phone could be heard above the hushed, reverent notes.
Finally, Mr. Gilbert could take no more: He stopped the orchestra.
A Philharmonic spokeswoman said Wednesday the music director has never before halted a performance because of a cellphone or any other type of disruption.
As the offending noise continued in a loop, Mr. Gilbert turned in its direction and pointedly asked that the phone be turned off. The audience let out a collective gasp.
The ringtone—believed to be an alarm—played on.
The audience wasn’t pleased. A Wall Street Journal reporter seated in the 19th row heard jeers hurled from the balconies. One man screamed: “Enough!” Another yelled: “Throw him out!” The audience clapped and hollered in agreement—and still the tone continued to sound amid the din.

Read the rest: New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com
Apparently none of Lincoln Center’s ushers heard anything unusual — the sound of the phone, the music stopping, or the in-hall commotion — to then kindly escort the patron out of the hall. Had I been an audience member sitting near a door during the phone-chiming episode, I think I would have left the hall to find an usher in the lobby and ask that he/she take action! 

New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com

The final movement of Mahler’s Ninth Symphony is a slow rumination on mortality, with quiet sections played by strings alone.

During the New York Philharmonic’s performance Tuesday night, it was interrupted by an iPhone.

The jarring ringtone—the device’s “Marimba” sound, which simulates the mallet instrument—intruded in the middle of the movement, emanating from the first row at Avery Fisher Hall.

When the phone wasn’t immediately hushed, audience members shook their heads. It continued to chime, and music director Alan Gilbert turned his head sharply to the left, signaling his displeasure.

Minutes passed. Each time the orchestra reached a quiet section, the phone could be heard above the hushed, reverent notes.

Finally, Mr. Gilbert could take no more: He stopped the orchestra.

A Philharmonic spokeswoman said Wednesday the music director has never before halted a performance because of a cellphone or any other type of disruption.

As the offending noise continued in a loop, Mr. Gilbert turned in its direction and pointedly asked that the phone be turned off. The audience let out a collective gasp.

The ringtone—believed to be an alarm—played on.

The audience wasn’t pleased. A Wall Street Journal reporter seated in the 19th row heard jeers hurled from the balconies. One man screamed: “Enough!” Another yelled: “Throw him out!” The audience clapped and hollered in agreement—and still the tone continued to sound amid the din.

Read the rest: New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com

Apparently none of Lincoln Center’s ushers heard anything unusual — the sound of the phone, the music stopping, or the in-hall commotion — to then kindly escort the patron out of the hall. Had I been an audience member sitting near a door during the phone-chiming episode, I think I would have left the hall to find an usher in the lobby and ask that he/she take action! 

Via unconsumption:

Texas to get the first packaging-free grocery store in the U.S.

In.gredients, which is slated to open this fall in Austin, will sell loose and bulk items, including “local, organic meats, dairy, baking goods, cooking oils, spices, grains, seasonal produce — the whole spectrum.” Customers will need to bring reusable containers from home (or use the store’s compostable containers), and weigh them before filling with the products they want. 

In.gredients’ package-free, zero-waste retail concept, similar to that of Unpackaged in London, is a great business model. The benefits of precycling — avoiding wasteful packaging — and buying only the amounts you need of locally sourced products, creating less landfill and saving money in the process, are many. 

If you have friends in Austin, encourage them to support in.gredients. And let’s hope in.gredients will expand to other markets. [Hi, Houston next, please.]

No matter where you live, check it out: You can follow the company’s progress here (blog and Web site), here (Facebook), and here (Twitter).


Scenes From Japan’s Historic Earthquake
A massive 8.9-magnitude quake hit northeast Japan on Friday, causing dozens of deaths, more than 80 fires, and a 10-meter (33-ft) tsunami along parts of the country’s coastline. Homes were swept away and damage is extensive.
via  theatlantic:
See more photos at In Focus
[Image: Reuters/Kyodo]

There are some really dramatic, moving images here.

Scenes From Japan’s Historic Earthquake

A massive 8.9-magnitude quake hit northeast Japan on Friday, causing dozens of deaths, more than 80 fires, and a 10-meter (33-ft) tsunami along parts of the country’s coastline. Homes were swept away and damage is extensive.

via  theatlantic:

See more photos at In Focus

[Image: Reuters/Kyodo]

There are some really dramatic, moving images here.

Typically, every one-cent increase in the pump price of gasoline takes more than $1 billion out of consumer pockets over a year.
What a terrible irony that her husband can go into space in a capsule and return home safely, but his wife’s safety can’t be assured outside a Safeway supermarket.
Eleanor Clift on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) in Newsweek. (via washingtonpoststyle)

File under “You can’t make this stuff up”:

"The Coast Guard says a nearly one-mile stretch of the Houston Ship Channel will be closed for at least four days as workers use pitchforks and fishnets to corral, pierce and remove 15,000 gallons of beef fat.” (Emphasis mine.)

(via Chron.com - Houston Chronicle)