Posts tagged music

unconsumption:

Happy Halloween and Day of the Dead!
Pictured: “Dead Media,” an installation that repurposes 497 VHS tapes. Created by friend of Unconsumption Noah Scalin (mentioned previously several times here), of the Skull-A-Day project. (photo via SkullADay here)
See also: Other videotape-related repurposing examples in earlier posts here.

unconsumption:

Happy Halloween and Day of the Dead!

Pictured: “Dead Media,” an installation that repurposes 497 VHS tapes. Created by friend of Unconsumption Noah Scalin (mentioned previously several times here), of the Skull-A-Day project. (photo via SkullADay here)

See also: Other videotape-related repurposing examples in earlier posts here.

poptech:

The Museum of Endangered Sounds, by Brendan Chilcutt, launched in January of this year and is a small treasure trove of sounds from outdated technology.

poptech:

The Museum of Endangered Sounds, by Brendan Chilcutt, launched in January of this year and is a small treasure trove of sounds from outdated technology.

Chorus puts tweets to music

In an effort to promote the city of Calgary, Tourism Calgary asked people on Twitter to suggest ways of staying warm this winter, then Calgary Philharmonic Chorus’s master set 20 of the tweeted replies to music.

The result? Tweets (including “gravy action on my cheese,” a.k.a. poutine) sung to the tune of Carl Orff’s dramatic “O Fortuna” from Carmina Burana.

(If you aren’t able to play the “Singing Tweets” embedded video, click here to view it.)

Via unconsumption:

For a project known as Scrapheap Orchestra, some top instrument makers in the UK transformed junk, including pieces of broken furniture, into 44 instruments for members of the BBC Concert Orchestra to play.

The quest to build an orchestra of instruments out of rubbish is more than just a musical spectacle - in the construction of these instruments we delve into the history of instrument making and the science of music, why different instruments are made the way they are, why some designs haven’t changed for hundreds of years and why, when played together, the sound of an orchestra is unlike anything else on earth.  (via BBC Four)

Next week, BBC Four will broadcast a 90-minute documentary that follows the project, which features the orchestra performing Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture on the scrap instruments at the 2011 BBC Proms. (Click here for broadcast info.)
For project photos, see Gramophone’s gallery, source of the above photo of orchestra members with instruments and conductor Charles Hazlewood. (Photo credit: BBC/Chris Christodoulou)
On a similar (instruments-made-from-junk) note, check out the Unconsumption posts on San Francisco’s Junkestra and New York Philharmonic’s percussion-from-junk exploration.

Via unconsumption:

For a project known as Scrapheap Orchestra, some top instrument makers in the UK transformed junk, including pieces of broken furniture, into 44 instruments for members of the BBC Concert Orchestra to play.

The quest to build an orchestra of instruments out of rubbish is more than just a musical spectacle - in the construction of these instruments we delve into the history of instrument making and the science of music, why different instruments are made the way they are, why some designs haven’t changed for hundreds of years and why, when played together, the sound of an orchestra is unlike anything else on earth.  (via BBC Four)

Next week, BBC Four will broadcast a 90-minute documentary that follows the project, which features the orchestra performing Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture on the scrap instruments at the 2011 BBC Proms. (Click here for broadcast info.)

For project photos, see Gramophone’s gallery, source of the above photo of orchestra members with instruments and conductor Charles Hazlewood. (Photo credit: BBC/Chris Christodoulou)

On a similar (instruments-made-from-junk) note, check out the Unconsumption posts on San Francisco’s Junkestra and New York Philharmonic’s percussion-from-junk exploration.

How-to: Make a “paper tree” in five easy steps

This project was inspired by two things: 1.) A neat “printed paper pine” item from Anthropologie, and 2.) my discovery, in the attic of my parents’ house, of an assortment of vintage sheet music — mainly trumpet and saxophone parts from the 1950s-1970s (that hadn’t been touched since the 1970s) when my father played in a band. 

Materials needed:

  • One chopstick
  • Something into which the chopstick can be anchored, like a scrap piece of wood, so the stick stands vertically (I upcycled an old plastic reel-to-reel tape spool as a base)
  • Several pages of printed sheet music, pages from a discarded book (or book you’ll no longer read), old holiday cards, or pages from magazines or catalogs
  • A piece of cardboard, roughly 1.5’x2’ in size 

Tools: 

  • Pinking shears, or something else that provides a decorative edge
  • Scissors
  • An ice pick, or other hole-punching device
  • Optional: Glue, small nail, hammer

Estimated time for completion: 

  • A couple of hours, though you probably can multi-task (read blogs, like I did, or watch TV) while working. 

Steps:

  1. Using pinking shears, or another cutting tool, cut the music (or other paper pieces) into squares. I cut my largest square approximately 5” x 5”, and smallest 1” x 1”. As I went along, I didn’t measure the pieces, but estimated the size based on that of the squares I’d just cut. For one tree, I used 40 paper squares. 
  2. Next, use scissors to cut the cardboard into small squares to add as spacers between the paper squares. The cardboard squares should be considerably smaller than the paper squares — that’ll help make the cardboard less visible. (I used a piece of recycled cardboard that held a case of cat food — it’s thinner and less rigid than some cardboard which made it easier to cut, I think.) Cut out the same number of cardboard squares as you have paper squares. 
  3. Poke holes in the center of the paper and cardboard squares. With an ice pick, I was able to punch holes through several squares at the same time. (Your mileage may vary.)
  4. Next, place your chopstick in whatever object you have handy to use as a base. You may want to nail or glue the chopstick into/onto your object. (I didn’t need to — my chopstick fits pretty snugly into my base.) 
  5. Now place the cardboard and paper squares onto the chopstick, pushing them down from the chopstick’s tapered end. Start with your largest square of cardboard, then add your largest piece of music on top of it. Continue stacking the cardboard and paper squares, keeping an eye on how your “tree” is shaping up. Hopefully, it’s a nice cone shape. 

As your layering of squares nears the top of the chopstick, stop at whatever point you want to. You could put a dot of glue on the topmost cardboard piece and paper square, to hold them in place. (I’d like to take the tree apart after the holidays — to store everything flat in a box — so I didn’t add glue.) Also, I left my chopstick top bare because I like the minimal look of it. You may want to “top” your tree with something.  

That’s it. Place your tree on a table, and enjoy!  

Note: This project carries a stamp of approval from Veto, my feline quality control officer.

Via futureoflistening:

A set of crockery which resonates a specific note when struck. (via Musical Tableware : Alexander Hulme)
Nicely paired with these musical glasses?

Via futureoflistening:

A set of crockery which resonates a specific note when struck. (via Musical Tableware : Alexander Hulme)

Nicely paired with these musical glasses?

Hitting the right notes
The book “Rhythms of the Game: The Link Between Musical and Athletic Performance,” written by former Yankee Bernie Williams and musician friends Dave Gluck and Bob Thompson, is “a grab bag of inspiration, self-help, history and anecdotes that focus on the kinship of baseball and music.”
(via Baseball Players Who Play Music, Too - NYTimes.com)

Hitting the right notes

The book “Rhythms of the Game: The Link Between Musical and Athletic Performance,” written by former Yankee Bernie Williams and musician friends Dave Gluck and Bob Thompson, is “a grab bag of inspiration, self-help, history and anecdotes that focus on the kinship of baseball and music.”

(via Baseball Players Who Play Music, Too - NYTimes.com)

Via unconsumption:

Twenty-year-old David Rocha dreams of one day becoming a professional violinist, but for now he plays for the community of Sao Miguel, a poor neighborhood outside Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paolo.

The violin he uses is fashioned out of old wood that he found at a garbage dump. The drawers of an old closet are now being used to play symphonies by Bach and Beethoven.

Rocha learned to make string instruments at a free workshop in his neighborhood’s social center.

With no money to buy good quality wood, Rocha began scavenging through the dumps near his home.

He has inspired other students to do the same.

Now, Rocha’s hand-made instruments are selling for up to $500 dollars and he says he feels honored to be able to help the environment by recycling trash into art.

(via Classical music made from garbage — CBS News)

In a world of instant musical gratification, where tunes from any genre or artist are available at the click of a mouse, can classical music remain relevant to the digital generation?

BBC News — Is classical music doomed?

A video of the debate (between participants Stephen Fry, BBC Radio 1 DJ Kissy Sell Out, Greg Sandow, et al.) will be available on the Cambridge Union Society’s Web site.

BBC

Via junkculture:

The Art of Un-Thinking
Artist Nancy Fouts creates intricate and original pieces of art from unlikely combinations of things…more here

Via junkculture:

The Art of Un-Thinking

Artist Nancy Fouts creates intricate and original pieces of art from unlikely combinations of things…more here

Via poptech:

Here’s an entertaining collaboration for your viewing pleasure - cellist Yo-Yo Ma and dancer Lil Buck caught on tape by Spike Jonze. Jonze explains:

The other day, I was lucky enough to be at an event to bring the arts back into schools and got to see an amazing collaboration between Yo-Yo Ma and a young dancer in LA, Lil Buck. Someone who knows Yo-Yo Ma had seen Lil Buck on YouTube and put them together. The dancing is Lil Buck’s own creation and unlike anything I’ve seen. Hope you enjoy.

Fabulous interpretations — from both Mr. Ma and Lil Buck — of Saint-Saens’s The Swan. Love performances in intimate settings like this one.

Via utnereader:

Musical obsession of the day: world’s longest marimba (sort of) played by an autonomous wooden ball (sort of). As Geoff Manaugh of BLDGBLOG puts it: “Landscape-scale musical instruments are an unfortunately under-explored typology. We need more wave organs and forest xylophones, more Aeolian harps and conspiratorially whistling infrastructures.”

Looks like this is a promotional piece for a (Japanese?) mobile phone brand, but still cool.

In arts matters:
SSO [Syracuse Symphony Orchestra] board votes to suspend operations; season canceled, no refunds planned — syracuse.com

The Syracuse Symphony Orchestra’s board of trustees voted Tuesday to suspend operations as of Sunday because of a shortage of funds.
The decision will bring the 50th anniversary season of the orchestra to an unceremonious end. There were more than 20 Syracuse and regional concerts remaining in the 2010-11 season.
The orchestra’s 18 full- and part-time staffers and 61 core and 14 contract musicians will be laid off Monday. However, eight employees will remain to help in the transition, Interim Executive Director Paul Brooks said, although he added that the organization has very little cash to carry out an orderly transition.
Brooks said no refunds would be issued to ticket holders, and he said any donations received during the SSO’s public fundraising campaign, “Keep the Music Playing” will not be returned.
Its April 27 concert by renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma also is canceled. But despite suspension of operations, Brooks said, the Syracuse Opera has been assured that the orchestra will play for its two performances of “The Pearl Fishers” April 8 and 10, said Brooks.
He said the SSO was without funds to continue operations because it fell short of its March fundraising goal of $445,000, failed to receive $1.3 million in concessions from the musicians for the 2011-12 season and had $5.5 million debt as the major reasons for the suspension. The SSO has a budget of $6.9 million for 2010-11 [down from $7.4 million for last season]. 
During the past eight months, the board has struggled to put its finances in order. In July, it was on the verge of being broke and being forced to close. An “angel investor” came to the rescue with operating funds.
Last summer, the SSO and musicians agreed to a shorter season, from 40 weeks to 34 weeks, but the same number of performances.

I expect additional information about next steps will be available on the Symphony’s Web site; however, at present there is no information about the suspension on it (or on the SSO’s Facebook or Twitter pages).
Related: The Detroit Symphony Orchestra remains on strike. Musicians there walked off the job last fall; last month, DSO management canceled the remainder of the season. The musicians and board reportedly are still trying to reach a (contract agreement) settlement.
Challenging times.

In arts matters:

SSO [Syracuse Symphony Orchestra] board votes to suspend operations; season canceled, no refunds planned — syracuse.com

The Syracuse Symphony Orchestra’s board of trustees voted Tuesday to suspend operations as of Sunday because of a shortage of funds.

The decision will bring the 50th anniversary season of the orchestra to an unceremonious end. There were more than 20 Syracuse and regional concerts remaining in the 2010-11 season.

The orchestra’s 18 full- and part-time staffers and 61 core and 14 contract musicians will be laid off Monday. However, eight employees will remain to help in the transition, Interim Executive Director Paul Brooks said, although he added that the organization has very little cash to carry out an orderly transition.

Brooks said no refunds would be issued to ticket holders, and he said any donations received during the SSO’s public fundraising campaign, “Keep the Music Playing” will not be returned.

Its April 27 concert by renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma also is canceled. But despite suspension of operations, Brooks said, the Syracuse Opera has been assured that the orchestra will play for its two performances of “The Pearl Fishers” April 8 and 10, said Brooks.

He said the SSO was without funds to continue operations because it fell short of its March fundraising goal of $445,000, failed to receive $1.3 million in concessions from the musicians for the 2011-12 season and had $5.5 million debt as the major reasons for the suspension. The SSO has a budget of $6.9 million for 2010-11 [down from $7.4 million for last season]. 

During the past eight months, the board has struggled to put its finances in order. In July, it was on the verge of being broke and being forced to close. An “angel investor” came to the rescue with operating funds.

Last summer, the SSO and musicians agreed to a shorter season, from 40 weeks to 34 weeks, but the same number of performances.

I expect additional information about next steps will be available on the Symphony’s Web site; however, at present there is no information about the suspension on it (or on the SSO’s Facebook or Twitter pages).

Related: The Detroit Symphony Orchestra remains on strike. Musicians there walked off the job last fall; last month, DSO management canceled the remainder of the season. The musicians and board reportedly are still trying to reach a (contract agreement) settlement.

Challenging times.

Opera House provides live streaming for mobile phones

Via emergentfutures:

USUALLY when patrons attend a performance at Sydney’s Opera House, they’re politely asked to switch off their mobile phones.

But this Sunday, when music lovers converge on the iconic Sydney venue for the 2011 YouTube Symphony Orchestra concert, audience members will be asked for the first time in the history of the Opera House to turn on their mobile phones and live stream the event worldwide.

Full Story: AustralianIT