Posts tagged museum

[Museum of Fine Arts, Houston] MFAH’s James Turrell acquisition adds to Houston’s bounty | Houston Art | via 29-95.com
Bonus: “Rice University has commissioned a [Turrell] skyspace for its campus following a multimillion-dollar gift from alumna Suzanne Deal Booth.”
Related: Earlier post about the Turrell skyspace in Houston’s Live Oak Friends Meeting House.
Update: Info from today, March 18, via The Rice Thresher, Rice University’s newspaper: The $6-million skyspace “will be situated on a raised grass hill so that people will be able to walk through it into a covered tunnel inside, where there will be space for 30 to 40 people to sit on benches. The second floor will have standing room for 60 to 70 people, along with a panel in the ceiling to display the sky and frame an LED display for shows at sunrise and sunset. The skyspace will be outfitted for musical performances by small ensembles.” The installation is expected to be completed by December.

[Museum of Fine Arts, Houston] MFAH’s James Turrell acquisition adds to Houston’s bounty | Houston Art | via 29-95.com

Bonus: “Rice University has commissioned a [Turrell] skyspace for its campus following a multimillion-dollar gift from alumna Suzanne Deal Booth.”

Related: Earlier post about the Turrell skyspace in Houston’s Live Oak Friends Meeting House.

Update: Info from today, March 18, via The Rice Thresher, Rice University’s newspaper: The $6-million skyspace “will be situated on a raised grass hill so that people will be able to walk through it into a covered tunnel inside, where there will be space for 30 to 40 people to sit on benches. The second floor will have standing room for 60 to 70 people, along with a panel in the ceiling to display the sky and frame an LED display for shows at sunrise and sunset. The skyspace will be outfitted for musical performances by small ensembles.” The installation is expected to be completed by December.

Via hydeordie:

Google has just launched Art Project which allows you to “explore” museums from around the world.

Explore museums with Street View technology: virtually move around the museum’s galleries, selecting works of art that interest you, navigate though interactive floor plans and learn more about the museum and you explore.
Artwork View: discover featured artworks at high resolution and use the custom viewer to zoom into paintings. Expanding the info panel allows you to read more about an artwork, find more works by that artist and watch related YouTube videos.
Create your own collection: the ‘Create an Artwork Collection’ feature allows you to save specific views of any of the 1000+ artworks and build your own personalised collection. Comments can be added to each painting and the whole collection can then be shared with friends and family.
via…

Why did I share this with you? I could tell through the internet that you didn’t want to do anything productive today anyway.

Via hydeordie:

Google has just launched Art Project which allows you to “explore” museums from around the world.

  • Explore museums with Street View technology: virtually move around the museum’s galleries, selecting works of art that interest you, navigate though interactive floor plans and learn more about the museum and you explore.
  • Artwork View: discover featured artworks at high resolution and use the custom viewer to zoom into paintings. Expanding the info panel allows you to read more about an artwork, find more works by that artist and watch related YouTube videos.
  • Create your own collection: the ‘Create an Artwork Collection’ feature allows you to save specific views of any of the 1000+ artworks and build your own personalised collection. Comments can be added to each painting and the whole collection can then be shared with friends and family.

via…

Why did I share this with you? I could tell through the internet that you didn’t want to do anything productive today anyway.

Art museums betting on the Super Bowl!

Impressionism and the Super Bowl might seem like strange bedfellows, but they will be getting a little bro time together this year in the spirit of the game. Continuing an art tradition that began last year, the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and the Milwaukee Art Museum (the closest museum to Green Bay, Wisc., home of the Packers), have agreed to make a gridiron bet. If Green Bay wins, the Carnegie will send Pierre Renoir’s “Bathers with a Crab” from the 1890s to Milwaukee as a temporary loan. If the Steelers win, the Carnegie’s patrons will get a brief visit from a Gustave Caillebotte, another water-focused scene titled “Boating on the Yerres” from 1877. (via Wagering Art Loans on the Super Bowl — NYTimes.com)

Last year, after the Saints’ win over the Colts, the Indianapolis Museum of Art loaned a painting by J.M.W. Turner to the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Art museums betting on the Super Bowl!

Impressionism and the Super Bowl might seem like strange bedfellows, but they will be getting a little bro time together this year in the spirit of the game. Continuing an art tradition that began last year, the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and the Milwaukee Art Museum (the closest museum to Green Bay, Wisc., home of the Packers), have agreed to make a gridiron bet. If Green Bay wins, the Carnegie will send Pierre Renoir’s “Bathers with a Crab” from the 1890s to Milwaukee as a temporary loan. If the Steelers win, the Carnegie’s patrons will get a brief visit from a Gustave Caillebotte, another water-focused scene titled “Boating on the Yerres” from 1877. (via Wagering Art Loans on the Super Bowl — NYTimes.com)

Last year, after the Saints’ win over the Colts, the Indianapolis Museum of Art loaned a painting by J.M.W. Turner to the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Via go:

In case you missed this. Great Wired story about tech-meets-high-art genius. 
reblogged via laughingsquid:

Artist Maps Apple’s UI Onto the Louvre’s Masterpieces

Via go:

In case you missed this. Great Wired story about tech-meets-high-art genius. 

reblogged via laughingsquid:

Artist Maps Apple’s UI Onto the Louvre’s Masterpieces

This an interesting partnership: Hipstamatic and The Dali Museum, offering the “Dali Museum GoodPak.”
Proceeds from sales of the “GoodPak” benefit the new museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, which is slated to open 1-1-11. In conjunction with the opening, the museum is encouraging Hipstamatic users to submit surreal photos for consideration in a contest ”curated” by filmaker/artist John Waters. Finalists’ pics will be displayed at the opening event.  

This an interesting partnership: Hipstamatic and The Dali Museum, offering the “Dali Museum GoodPak.”

Proceeds from sales of the “GoodPak” benefit the new museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, which is slated to open 1-1-11. In conjunction with the opening, the museum is encouraging Hipstamatic users to submit surreal photos for consideration in a contest ”curated” by filmaker/artist John Waters. Finalists’ pics will be displayed at the opening event.  

Art matters:
Woohoo! The Tumblr-verse is a better place now that the Art Gallery of Ontario is in it. 
I like how AGO staff members are using Tumblr: their Art of the Day posts featuring images and information are helping to educate us about various works in the museum’s collection.
[Disclosure: I’m a loyal AGO fan: During my Toronto years, I worked as a volunteer at the museum almost every Sunday. :) ]
The photos pictured above and here are phone-cam shots captured during a 2009 AGO visit.

Art matters:

Woohoo! The Tumblr-verse is a better place now that the Art Gallery of Ontario is in it.

I like how AGO staff members are using Tumblr: their Art of the Day posts featuring images and information are helping to educate us about various works in the museum’s collection.

[Disclosure: I’m a loyal AGO fan: During my Toronto years, I worked as a volunteer at the museum almost every Sunday. :) ]

The photos pictured above and here are phone-cam shots captured during a 2009 AGO visit.

Architecture matters
1:1 - Architects Build Small Spaces - Victoria and Albert Museum
"Using the landscape of the Museum as a test site, the V&A invited nineteen architects to submit proposals for structures that examine notions of refuge and retreat. From these nineteen concept submissions, seven were selected for construction at full-scale." Exhibition open through August 30, 2010.

Architecture matters

1:1 - Architects Build Small Spaces - Victoria and Albert Museum

"Using the landscape of the Museum as a test site, the V&A invited nineteen architects to submit proposals for structures that examine notions of refuge and retreat. From these nineteen concept submissions, seven were selected for construction at full-scale." Exhibition open through August 30, 2010.

In #Loispalooza news (a.k.a. Houston Museum of Natural Science “Lois”-the-corpse-flower “watch,” day 16):
On the HMNS blog, Zac, the affable horticulturalist (now on Twitter — @hortzac), offers an update regarding today’s introduction of ethylene gas, a natural “hormone” (administered via a bag of overripe bananas) that is hoped will help nudge Lois’s blossom to open, and the closing of the museum from midnight tonight until 9:00 a.m. Saturday (read: break time for Lois), a change from the 24-hour schedule.
Also: Erin’s blog entry recaps Wednesday’s and Thursday’s haiku tweet-fest, which yours truly was inspired to instigate.
In case you missed it: my Wednesday, July 14, post describing Lois, her significance.
Stay tuned.

In #Loispalooza news (a.k.a. Houston Museum of Natural Science “Lois”-the-corpse-flower “watch,” day 16):

On the HMNS blog, Zac, the affable horticulturalist (now on Twitter — @hortzac), offers an update regarding today’s introduction of ethylene gas, a natural “hormone” (administered via a bag of overripe bananas) that is hoped will help nudge Lois’s blossom to open, and the closing of the museum from midnight tonight until 9:00 a.m. Saturday (read: break time for Lois), a change from the 24-hour schedule.

Also: Erin’s blog entry recaps Wednesday’s and Thursday’s haiku tweet-fest, which yours truly was inspired to instigate.

In case you missed it: my Wednesday, July 14, post describing Lois, her significance.

Stay tuned.

BIG botanical buzz
Crowds in Houston (and elsewhere) await the imminent blossoming of the Houston Museum of Natural Science’s six-foot-tall rare corpse flower (Amorphophallus titanium), affectionately named “Lois,” that bears resemblance to an oversized endive.
When Lois opens (we’re on day 14 of “bloom watch” here), it will be the 29th such cultivated corpse flower-blooming event in the U.S., and only the second in Texas.
As the plant’s outer leaves begin to unfurl (looking like a large calla lily with a purple Elizabethan collar), the bud becomes a gas chamber, emitting an odor that smells like a decomposing carcass (hence the common “corpse” name) to attract pollinating carrion beetles. Total smell time may last from eight to 12 hours. Once opened, the flower is short-lived, shrinking in size days later, then dying back to an underground, bulb-like corm. According to the HMNS blog, “once the flower dies back the plant may not flower again for many years, if ever.” During the brief flowering phase, museum horticulturalists will attempt to hand-pollinate the plant to help form future seeds.
To accommodate visitors, the museum is now open 24/7, and a live Web cam, streaming to a dedicated page with Twitter feed in sidebar, is entertaining viewers. Foursquare users who check in for the first time at the museum will gain free admission (an $8 value) to the Cockrell Butterfly Center where Lois is housed.
To help commemorate the event, Lois’s enthusiastic fans are creating corpse flower-centric music playlists, haiku, and interacting with the person(s) behind @CorpzFlowrLois, a rogue Twitter account.
Stay tuned.
Photo credit: U.S. Botanical Garden

BIG botanical buzz

Crowds in Houston (and elsewhere) await the imminent blossoming of the Houston Museum of Natural Science’s six-foot-tall rare corpse flower (Amorphophallus titanium), affectionately named “Lois,” that bears resemblance to an oversized endive.

When Lois opens (we’re on day 14 of “bloom watch” here), it will be the 29th such cultivated corpse flower-blooming event in the U.S., and only the second in Texas.

As the plant’s outer leaves begin to unfurl (looking like a large calla lily with a purple Elizabethan collar), the bud becomes a gas chamber, emitting an odor that smells like a decomposing carcass (hence the common “corpse” name) to attract pollinating carrion beetles. Total smell time may last from eight to 12 hours. Once opened, the flower is short-lived, shrinking in size days later, then dying back to an underground, bulb-like corm. According to the HMNS blog, “once the flower dies back the plant may not flower again for many years, if ever.” During the brief flowering phase, museum horticulturalists will attempt to hand-pollinate the plant to help form future seeds.

To accommodate visitors, the museum is now open 24/7, and a live Web cam, streaming to a dedicated page with Twitter feed in sidebar, is entertaining viewers. Foursquare users who check in for the first time at the museum will gain free admission (an $8 value) to the Cockrell Butterfly Center where Lois is housed.

To help commemorate the event, Lois’s enthusiastic fans are creating corpse flower-centric music playlists, haiku, and interacting with the person(s) behind @CorpzFlowrLois, a rogue Twitter account.

Stay tuned.

Photo credit: U.S. Botanical Garden

Architecture matters:
When asked by Vanity Fair to choose the five most important works of architecture created since 1980, 52 [unnamed] experts named 132 different structures.
To see the top 21 works, listed in order of popularity, view V.F.’s slideshow here.
Disclosure: As the long-reigning Foursquare ‘mayor’ of Houston’s Menil Park, I feel compelled to point out that the Renzo Piano-designed Menil Collection building (housing the museum) ranked at #2, behind Frank Gehry’s Bilbao Museum. ;-)
Menil Collection photo credit: Paul Hester

Architecture matters:

When asked by Vanity Fair to choose the five most important works of architecture created since 1980, 52 [unnamed] experts named 132 different structures.

To see the top 21 works, listed in order of popularity, view V.F.’s slideshow here.

Disclosure: As the long-reigning Foursquare ‘mayor’ of Houston’s Menil Park, I feel compelled to point out that the Renzo Piano-designed Menil Collection building (housing the museum) ranked at #2, behind Frank Gehry’s Bilbao Museum. ;-)

Menil Collection photo credit: Paul Hester

Today’s diversion: A two-minute-long video showing every painting on @MuseumModernArt's 4th & 5th floors.