Posts tagged iPhone

murketing:


Yesterday I tagged along with Lorna, from Knits For Life (my sister!) while she installed this super awesome iphone yarn bomb on this sad looking pay phone. As you can see in the before above, the receiver is gone so this is a definite upgrade. I wanted to ask her a few questions about the idea and her process

Read it here: The Dapper Toad: iPayPhone Yarn Bomb)
I really like this, and have just lately been thinking about abandoned pay phones and booths. Who owns them, exactly?
Anyway this is a cool project. Via No Expectations.

Today, in urban intervention love.

murketing:

Yesterday I tagged along with Lorna, from Knits For Life (my sister!) while she installed this super awesome iphone yarn bomb on this sad looking pay phone. As you can see in the before above, the receiver is gone so this is a definite upgrade. I wanted to ask her a few questions about the idea and her process

Read it here: The Dapper Toad: iPayPhone Yarn Bomb)

I really like this, and have just lately been thinking about abandoned pay phones and booths. Who owns them, exactly?

Anyway this is a cool project. Via No Expectations.

Today, in urban intervention love.

New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com

The final movement of Mahler’s Ninth Symphony is a slow rumination on mortality, with quiet sections played by strings alone.
During the New York Philharmonic’s performance Tuesday night, it was interrupted by an iPhone.
The jarring ringtone—the device’s “Marimba” sound, which simulates the mallet instrument—intruded in the middle of the movement, emanating from the first row at Avery Fisher Hall.
When the phone wasn’t immediately hushed, audience members shook their heads. It continued to chime, and music director Alan Gilbert turned his head sharply to the left, signaling his displeasure.
Minutes passed. Each time the orchestra reached a quiet section, the phone could be heard above the hushed, reverent notes.
Finally, Mr. Gilbert could take no more: He stopped the orchestra.
A Philharmonic spokeswoman said Wednesday the music director has never before halted a performance because of a cellphone or any other type of disruption.
As the offending noise continued in a loop, Mr. Gilbert turned in its direction and pointedly asked that the phone be turned off. The audience let out a collective gasp.
The ringtone—believed to be an alarm—played on.
The audience wasn’t pleased. A Wall Street Journal reporter seated in the 19th row heard jeers hurled from the balconies. One man screamed: “Enough!” Another yelled: “Throw him out!” The audience clapped and hollered in agreement—and still the tone continued to sound amid the din.

Read the rest: New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com
Apparently none of Lincoln Center’s ushers heard anything unusual — the sound of the phone, the music stopping, or the in-hall commotion — to then kindly escort the patron out of the hall. Had I been an audience member sitting near a door during the phone-chiming episode, I think I would have left the hall to find an usher in the lobby and ask that he/she take action! 

New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com

The final movement of Mahler’s Ninth Symphony is a slow rumination on mortality, with quiet sections played by strings alone.

During the New York Philharmonic’s performance Tuesday night, it was interrupted by an iPhone.

The jarring ringtone—the device’s “Marimba” sound, which simulates the mallet instrument—intruded in the middle of the movement, emanating from the first row at Avery Fisher Hall.

When the phone wasn’t immediately hushed, audience members shook their heads. It continued to chime, and music director Alan Gilbert turned his head sharply to the left, signaling his displeasure.

Minutes passed. Each time the orchestra reached a quiet section, the phone could be heard above the hushed, reverent notes.

Finally, Mr. Gilbert could take no more: He stopped the orchestra.

A Philharmonic spokeswoman said Wednesday the music director has never before halted a performance because of a cellphone or any other type of disruption.

As the offending noise continued in a loop, Mr. Gilbert turned in its direction and pointedly asked that the phone be turned off. The audience let out a collective gasp.

The ringtone—believed to be an alarm—played on.

The audience wasn’t pleased. A Wall Street Journal reporter seated in the 19th row heard jeers hurled from the balconies. One man screamed: “Enough!” Another yelled: “Throw him out!” The audience clapped and hollered in agreement—and still the tone continued to sound amid the din.

Read the rest: New York Philharmonic Halted by iPhone During Mahler’s Ninth Symphony — WSJ.com

Apparently none of Lincoln Center’s ushers heard anything unusual — the sound of the phone, the music stopping, or the in-hall commotion — to then kindly escort the patron out of the hall. Had I been an audience member sitting near a door during the phone-chiming episode, I think I would have left the hall to find an usher in the lobby and ask that he/she take action! 

This an interesting partnership: Hipstamatic and The Dali Museum, offering the “Dali Museum GoodPak.”
Proceeds from sales of the “GoodPak” benefit the new museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, which is slated to open 1-1-11. In conjunction with the opening, the museum is encouraging Hipstamatic users to submit surreal photos for consideration in a contest ”curated” by filmaker/artist John Waters. Finalists’ pics will be displayed at the opening event.  

This an interesting partnership: Hipstamatic and The Dali Museum, offering the “Dali Museum GoodPak.”

Proceeds from sales of the “GoodPak” benefit the new museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, which is slated to open 1-1-11. In conjunction with the opening, the museum is encouraging Hipstamatic users to submit surreal photos for consideration in a contest ”curated” by filmaker/artist John Waters. Finalists’ pics will be displayed at the opening event.  

Via hydeordie:

The [free] new “Buildings” app for iPhones tells you about local architecture.
An excerpt from Archinect’s review:

"… After playing around with it for the last week, I’ve become hooked. I’m finding myself launching the app as I move around Los Angeles to check which buildings surround me. The database is a little sparse for this user’s city, at the moment, but the open-source nature of this well-constructed platform will inevitably help fill out the gaps quickly."


I find the user-generated-content aspect of the app, as described by the developer, to be quite interesting:
"Architects can upload their own work and other users can also upload  their own photos and videos and share with their online community via Facebook or Twitter. What this means is ANYBODY can contribute images/info to the site. (Read as Molly saying: Lots of opportunity for architectural firms’ self-promotion, and strong likelihood of erroneous information submitted by random persons.)

Via hydeordie:

The [free] new “Buildings” app for iPhones tells you about local architecture.

An excerpt from Archinect’s review:

"… After playing around with it for the last week, I’ve become hooked. I’m finding myself launching the app as I move around Los Angeles to check which buildings surround me. The database is a little sparse for this user’s city, at the moment, but the open-source nature of this well-constructed platform will inevitably help fill out the gaps quickly."

I find the user-generated-content aspect of the app, as described by the developer, to be quite interesting:

"Architects can upload their own work and other users can also upload their own photos and videos and share with their online community via Facebook or Twitter.

What this means is ANYBODY can contribute images/info to the site. (Read as Molly saying: Lots of opportunity for architectural firms’ self-promotion, and strong likelihood of erroneous information submitted by random persons.)

Augmented reality for architecture geeks

(story from Fast Company about soon-to-be-released mobile application though which designers envision creating a mobile guide to buildings)