Posts tagged ghost signs

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

Abandoned, in Mexia, Texas. (Taken with Instagram)

Abandoned, in Mexia, Texas. (Taken with Instagram)

Same building: different side *and* different ghost sign. The previous photo shows the back of the building, which most people probably don’t see. If you missed it, check it out — it’s pretty awesome.   (Taken with instagram in Corsicana, Texas)

Same building: different side *and* different ghost sign. The previous photo shows the back of the building, which most people probably don’t see. If you missed it, check it out — it’s pretty awesome. (Taken with instagram in Corsicana, Texas)

I like it here. (Taken with Instagram at Smith General Store in downtown Corsicana, Texas)

I like it here. (Taken with Instagram at Smith General Store in downtown Corsicana, Texas)

Two ghost signs on the same building. Bonus! (Taken with Instagram at Bishop Arts District in Dallas, Texas)

Two ghost signs on the same building. Bonus! (Taken with Instagram at Bishop Arts District in Dallas, Texas)

This vacant industrial building has not only a #ghostsign on it, but a yellow coat hanging from one of its windows.  #awesome (Taken with instagram)
Subsequent note: In recent years, at least one club has operated out of the building (which could help explain the presence of the coat!). The warehouse is located at 2001 Commerce Street — within shouting distance of Minute Maid Park — east of downtown Houston.
Thanks to a Google search, I now know that Graybar Electric Company was formerly housed in the building. The company’s old logos jibe with the ghost sign’s faded paint. See history.graybar.com/1942-1964.php and history.graybar.com.

This vacant industrial building has not only a #ghostsign on it, but a yellow coat hanging from one of its windows. #awesome (Taken with instagram)

Subsequent note: In recent years, at least one club has operated out of the building (which could help explain the presence of the coat!). The warehouse is located at 2001 Commerce Street — within shouting distance of Minute Maid Park — east of downtown Houston.

Thanks to a Google search, I now know that Graybar Electric Company was formerly housed in the building. The company’s old logos jibe with the ghost sign’s faded paint. See history.graybar.com/1942-1964.php and history.graybar.com.

Meeting a friend for brunch on the east side of town gave me good reason to drive around the area east of downtown Houston (east of Minute Maid Park, for baseball fans!). I wish I knew the back story behind this building, which appears to be empty, and its ghost signs.
Among the words I can make out are “No dust. No dirt.” And: “5 ¢.” “Metro.” Odd combo. 
(Taken with instagram, with no filter.)

Meeting a friend for brunch on the east side of town gave me good reason to drive around the area east of downtown Houston (east of Minute Maid Park, for baseball fans!). I wish I knew the back story behind this building, which appears to be empty, and its ghost signs.

Among the words I can make out are “No dust. No dirt.” And: “5 ¢.” “Metro.” Odd combo. 

(Taken with instagram, with no filter.)

At last, pleased to add this pic to my ghost sign series! … Had time today to drive by this building — the former Waddell House Furnishing Co. building — before I leave this side of Houston. Sadly, it’s a disused building. What future does it have?
Bonus: captured a bird in flight!
(Taken with instagram, with gotham filter.)

At last, pleased to add this pic to my ghost sign series! … Had time today to drive by this building — the former Waddell House Furnishing Co. building — before I leave this side of Houston. Sadly, it’s a disused building. What future does it have?

Bonus: captured a bird in flight!

(Taken with instagram, with gotham filter.)

You don’t see something like this every day.
During a random, first-time visit yesterday to Tim Siedell’s bad banana blog, Tim’s entry from Friday, featuring the work of Austin-based photographer Jay B. Sauceda, caught my eye. Tim had posted several photos and this description from Jay’s Web site: “Before there was vinyl printing  there were big brick walls and  craftsmen who covered said walls with  their commercial artwork. This is  my ever growing collection of those  that I find while on the road.”
Midway through my looking at Tim’s post, I scrolled back up to the second photo — it’s the one pictured above — and stared at it for several seconds before my brain “clicked.” Tim’s blog didn’t give the building’s location; for me, it didn’t need to … the Hoskins Building, which I know sits near the courthouse in the somewhat small, central Texas town of Gonzales (pop. ~8,000), shows a partial view of a weathered Coca-Cola ad for my  grandfather’s business!

You don’t see something like this every day.

During a random, first-time visit yesterday to Tim Siedell’s bad banana blog, Tim’s entry from Friday, featuring the work of Austin-based photographer Jay B. Sauceda, caught my eye. Tim had posted several photos and this description from Jay’s Web site: “Before there was vinyl printing there were big brick walls and craftsmen who covered said walls with their commercial artwork. This is my ever growing collection of those that I find while on the road.”

Midway through my looking at Tim’s post, I scrolled back up to the second photo — it’s the one pictured above — and stared at it for several seconds before my brain “clicked.” Tim’s blog didn’t give the building’s location; for me, it didn’t need to … the Hoskins Building, which I know sits near the courthouse in the somewhat small, central Texas town of Gonzales (pop. ~8,000), shows a partial view of a weathered Coca-Cola ad for my grandfather’s business!