Posts tagged design

wnyc:

Thanks to a new city law, all construction sites must now have a “viewing panel” that lets you peek in and see what’s going on. We explained the law on the Brian Lehrer Show blog, and asked you to snap a picture through that little diamond-shaped peephole. Now, here are our favorite of your photos.
-Jody, BL Show-

Gotta say I like this.

wnyc:

Thanks to a new city law, all construction sites must now have a “viewing panel” that lets you peek in and see what’s going on. We explained the law on the Brian Lehrer Show blog, and asked you to snap a picture through that little diamond-shaped peephole. Now, here are our favorite of your photos.

-Jody, BL Show-

Gotta say I like this.

wesandersonpalettes:

Sam: Why do you always use binoculars?
Suzy: It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power.

Follow a new Tumblr that features stills of scenes from Wes Anderson films and highlights each scene’s color palette? Why not?
File under: Today’s spot o’ color.

wesandersonpalettes:

Sam: Why do you always use binoculars?

Suzy: It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power.

Follow a new Tumblr that features stills of scenes from Wes Anderson films and highlights each scene’s color palette? Why not?

File under: Today’s spot o’ color.

theatlantic:

A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.
Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]


Enjoyed reading this.

theatlantic:

A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.

Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]

Enjoyed reading this.

hyperallergic:

How illustrator Charles Schridde envisioned the “House of the Future” for Motorola in 1961

h/t Henry Chalian


We’re beyond the point of a fresh coat of paint and a new sales pitch. If we’re going to continue to hold on to the single-family home, we need to transform it. There is a demand for smaller, more energy-efficient homes in less car-dependent neighborhoods; all aspects of the industry, from designers to lenders to planners to consumers, should meet it. In this era of anti-government fervor, subsidizing the American Dream isn’t an option; transforming it is the only one we’ve got.

(via Shifting the Suburban Paradigm - NYTimes.com)

We’re beyond the point of a fresh coat of paint and a new sales pitch. If we’re going to continue to hold on to the single-family home, we need to transform it. There is a demand for smaller, more energy-efficient homes in less car-dependent neighborhoods; all aspects of the industry, from designers to lenders to planners to consumers, should meet it. In this era of anti-government fervor, subsidizing the American Dream isn’t an option; transforming it is the only one we’ve got.

(via Shifting the Suburban Paradigm - NYTimes.com)

Via murketing:

“Arne tried to comment on the Breaking Bad post and was presented with a bunch of ridiculously indecipherable Captchas. Here are just a few of the ones he was challenged with.” More: A gallery of indecipherable Captchas – Boing Boing

Via murketing:

“Arne tried to comment on the Breaking Bad post and was presented with a bunch of ridiculously indecipherable Captchas. Here are just a few of the ones he was challenged with.” More: A gallery of indecipherable Captchas – Boing Boing

Design matters:
I have to confess I’ve kind of had a thing for GreenpointWorks’ Acapulco Chairs — I really like their lightness, transparency (great for small-ish spaces) — and have considered buying one to use in my living room, though wasn’t wild about the colored vinyl webbing options. At last, as Design Sponge revealed this week, GreenpointWorks is producing a version with leather webbing. I think I need to start a chair fund now. 
(via Design*Sponge)

Design matters:

I have to confess I’ve kind of had a thing for GreenpointWorks’ Acapulco Chairs — I really like their lightness, transparency (great for small-ish spaces) — and have considered buying one to use in my living room, though wasn’t wild about the colored vinyl webbing options. At last, as Design Sponge revealed this week, GreenpointWorks is producing a version with leather webbing. I think I need to start a chair fund now. 

(via Design*Sponge)


Procter & Gamble Co., General Mills Inc., Hostess Brands Inc. and PepsiCo Inc. are pulling old package designs out of their archives for brands like Tide, Cheerios and Doritos and bringing them back to store shelves. Smaller companies and start-ups are using fonts, colors or designs that evoke the past on their labels.
The move is a U-turn from labels cluttered with specific claims like “easy pour spout” or “better tasting” to packaging that plays on the emotions. Over time, labels have gotten busier because computers allowed for complex designs and marketers wanted products to stand out on crowded shelves.
"We got to the point where you couldn’t add one more bling thing to a package," says Christine Mau, director of design at Kimberly-Clark Corp., the maker of Kleenex and Huggies, among other items.
The retro movement is driven, in part, by consumer-goods companies feeling pressure from retailers’ private-label products, which are generally less expensive. 
Manufacturers also say they are hoping to benefit from consumers’ generally sunny impression of the past and stand out in a sea of modern, glossy packages.

Full story: New! Improved! (and Very Old) - WSJ.com

Procter & Gamble Co., General Mills Inc., Hostess Brands Inc. and PepsiCo Inc. are pulling old package designs out of their archives for brands like Tide, Cheerios and Doritos and bringing them back to store shelves. Smaller companies and start-ups are using fonts, colors or designs that evoke the past on their labels.

The move is a U-turn from labels cluttered with specific claims like “easy pour spout” or “better tasting” to packaging that plays on the emotions. Over time, labels have gotten busier because computers allowed for complex designs and marketers wanted products to stand out on crowded shelves.

"We got to the point where you couldn’t add one more bling thing to a package," says Christine Mau, director of design at Kimberly-Clark Corp., the maker of Kleenex and Huggies, among other items.

The retro movement is driven, in part, by consumer-goods companies feeling pressure from retailers’ private-label products, which are generally less expensive. 

Manufacturers also say they are hoping to benefit from consumers’ generally sunny impression of the past and stand out in a sea of modern, glossy packages.

Full story: New! Improved! (and Very Old) - WSJ.com

Via emergentfutures:

Flexible condos can be reconfigured and resized
It’s a fact of life that people’s needs change over time, and that’s as true in housing as any other industry. Aiming to create condominiums that are flexible enough to accommodate some of that change, Canadian architectural firm Sweeny Sterling Finlayson & Co. has created a new, modular design for living spaces that allows them to adapt when needed.
Full Story: Springwise

Via emergentfutures:

Flexible condos can be reconfigured and resized

It’s a fact of life that people’s needs change over time, and that’s as true in housing as any other industry. Aiming to create condominiums that are flexible enough to accommodate some of that change, Canadian architectural firm Sweeny Sterling Finlayson & Co. has created a new, modular design for living spaces that allows them to adapt when needed.

Full Story: Springwise

Via unconsumption:

Thanks to Unconsumptioneer extraordinaire Rob, here’s a two-fer post celebrating:
1) cork repurposing [it’s a bit early for wine o’clock here, but it’s wine o’clock somewhere, right?], and 2) Earth day.

Cork forests are one of the largest providers of oxygen to the earth, in addition to being one of the most sustainable and environmentally harvested forests in the world. Cork forests also have the world’s highest amount of forest biodiversity, including endangered species like the Iberian Lynx, the Iberian Imperial Eagle and the Barbary Deer. It’s sort of a big deal.
In honor of Earth Day and cork forests, our retail friends at Anthropologie have joined forces with the Cork Forest Conservation Alliance (CFCA) to raise awareness and preserve Mediterranean cork forests (which just so happens to be one of the Earth’s most valuable ecosystems). CFCA donated 2 million corks to 153 Anthropologie stores that were then turned into window displays. (via Retail Design Diva)

If you’re wondering what will happen to the corks after Anthropologie takes down the displays, this post says: ”The installations will actually be available for “adoption” after Earth Day, in exchange for a contribution to CFCA. Remaining corks will be returned to the organization and recycled through its Cork ReHarvest program.” [We cover Cork ReHarvest and CFCA in this earlier Unconsumption post.]
Pictured: Display in Anthropologie’s Troy, Michigan, store. (via Our Earth Day 2011 Windows Facebook album)

I like this. All of it.

Via unconsumption:

Thanks to Unconsumptioneer extraordinaire Rob, here’s a two-fer post celebrating:

1) cork repurposing [it’s a bit early for wine o’clock here, but it’s wine o’clock somewhere, right?], and 2) Earth day.

Cork forests are one of the largest providers of oxygen to the earth, in addition to being one of the most sustainable and environmentally harvested forests in the world. Cork forests also have the world’s highest amount of forest biodiversity, including endangered species like the Iberian Lynx, the Iberian Imperial Eagle and the Barbary Deer. It’s sort of a big deal.

In honor of Earth Day and cork forests, our retail friends at Anthropologie have joined forces with the Cork Forest Conservation Alliance (CFCA) to raise awareness and preserve Mediterranean cork forests (which just so happens to be one of the Earth’s most valuable ecosystems). CFCA donated 2 million corks to 153 Anthropologie stores that were then turned into window displays. (via Retail Design Diva)

If you’re wondering what will happen to the corks after Anthropologie takes down the displays, this post says: ”The installations will actually be available for “adoption” after Earth Day, in exchange for a contribution to CFCA. Remaining corks will be returned to the organization and recycled through its Cork ReHarvest program.” [We cover Cork ReHarvest and CFCA in this earlier Unconsumption post.]

Pictured: Display in Anthropologie’s Troy, Michigan, store. (via Our Earth Day 2011 Windows Facebook album)

I like this. All of it.

Via kateoplis:

Zaha Hadid’s Guangzhou Opera House has finally opened in China (video)

Beautifully shot video, with overwhelmingly positive remarks about the opera house from The Guardian’s architecture critic, Jonathan Glancey, including this gem: “It’s one of the most remarkable buildings not just in China, but in the whole world.”

Via kateoplis:

Zaha Hadid’s Guangzhou Opera House has finally opened in China (video)

Beautifully shot video, with overwhelmingly positive remarks about the opera house from The Guardian’s architecture critic, Jonathan Glancey, including this gem: “It’s one of the most remarkable buildings not just in China, but in the whole world.”