Posts tagged community

springwise:

QR codes used to encourage citizens to adopt neighborhood trees
The District of Columbia’s Department of Transportation has recently launched a new scheme as part of its Canopy Keepers project, which enables residents to easily adopt a newly-planted tree using QR codes. READ MORE…

springwise:

QR codes used to encourage citizens to adopt neighborhood trees

The District of Columbia’s Department of Transportation has recently launched a new scheme as part of its Canopy Keepers project, which enables residents to easily adopt a newly-planted tree using QR codes. READ MORE…

unconsumption:


utnereader:


Phone booths re-purposed as micro-libraries in New York City. (via Designboom)


I love urban interventions, especially when books are involved. (Check out this newspaper stand converted into a community lending library, if you haven’t already seen it.)
Anyway, this NYC phone-booth-turned-book-swap is a great addition to the group of repurposed phone booths featured previously on Unconsumption (here), which includes other micro-libraries in various cities.
Are there other repurposed phone booths that we — your friendly Unconsumption hosts — haven’t yet come across? 

unconsumption:

utnereader:

Phone booths re-purposed as micro-libraries in New York City. (via Designboom)

I love urban interventions, especially when books are involved. (Check out this newspaper stand converted into a community lending library, if you haven’t already seen it.)

Anyway, this NYC phone-booth-turned-book-swap is a great addition to the group of repurposed phone booths featured previously on Unconsumption (here), which includes other micro-libraries in various cities.

Are there other repurposed phone booths that we — your friendly Unconsumption hosts — haven’t yet come across? 

What attaches people to their communities?

Why do people love where they live? Why does it matter? 

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Gallup partnered to survey 43,000 individuals in 26 communities (where Knight owned newspapers), and summarized their findings in the Soul of the Community report. The study, conducted over three years, was designed “to find out what emotionally attaches people to a community, what makes them want to put down roots and build a life there.” Overall, such attachment helps to boost economic growth.

The top drivers that attach “people to place” include things that relate directly to daily quality of life: “social offerings, such as entertainment venues and places to meet, openness (how welcoming a place is), and the area’s aesthetics (its physical beauty and green spaces).”

For complete survey findings, visit www.soulofthecommunity.org.

What Attaches People to Their Communities? | Knight Soul of the Community #SOTC

Auto-reblogging my Unconsumption post because:
a) the project is in Toronto, and involves b) adaptive reuse of old buildings, c) the preservation of green space / creation of a nature preserve, d) a public-private (non-profit) partnership, e) a farmers’ market, f) a repurposed shipping container, g) community gardens, and h) sustainable building principles, among other things that are of interest (to me)!
Via unconsumption:

A retired shipping container, known now as the Welcome Hut, helps to orient visitors as they enter the grounds of Toronto’s Evergreen Brick Works (EBW), a new 40-acre nature preserve / redevelopment project — billed as “Canada’s first community environmental center.” EBW is a project of Evergreen, a national charity dedicated to bringing nature into public spaces, schools, and homes.
Several components of EBW’s master plan have been completed on the site that was, for more than a century, a brick factory with massive kilns (decommissioned in the 1980s), with adjacent clay/shale quarry in a ravine along the Don River. 
From an August 2010 Toronto Life story:

In an earlier age, Toronto would have torn down the brick sheds, but we are beginning to see new value in these old places. We don’t just come for the food or the chit-chat with a charming artisanal cheesemaker. We also come for the worn-down bricks and the history immersion. We crave these historic buildings that can root us in our city’s past and tell us where we came from. The fashion for ruins was also hugely popular in 18th-century England. Back then, people were leaving the land to work in factories. Similarly, as our factories close, we’re developing a nostalgic appreciation for manufacturing.

 
EBW’s offerings are slated to include a sustainable garden center, farmers’ market, demonstration gardens and kitchens, conference and event facilities, community bike space, art exhibition areas, and programs for families and kids. 
The Welcome Hut — Dwell.com slideshow here — was designed so that it could be relocated elsewhere on the property, to serve other purposes as needed. 
(spotted on Twitter, via Dwell’s Miyoko Ohtake, @miyokoohtake)

Auto-reblogging my Unconsumption post because:

a) the project is in Toronto, and involves b) adaptive reuse of old buildings, c) the preservation of green space / creation of a nature preserve, d) a public-private (non-profit) partnership, e) a farmers’ market, f) a repurposed shipping container, g) community gardens, and h) sustainable building principles, among other things that are of interest (to me)!

Via unconsumption:

A retired shipping container, known now as the Welcome Hut, helps to orient visitors as they enter the grounds of Toronto’s Evergreen Brick Works (EBW), a new 40-acre nature preserve / redevelopment project — billed as “Canada’s first community environmental center.” EBW is a project of Evergreen, a national charity dedicated to bringing nature into public spaces, schools, and homes.

Several components of EBW’s master plan have been completed on the site that was, for more than a century, a brick factory with massive kilns (decommissioned in the 1980s), with adjacent clay/shale quarry in a ravine along the Don River. 

From an August 2010 Toronto Life story:

In an earlier age, Toronto would have torn down the brick sheds, but we are beginning to see new value in these old places. We don’t just come for the food or the chit-chat with a charming artisanal cheesemaker. We also come for the worn-down bricks and the history immersion. We crave these historic buildings that can root us in our city’s past and tell us where we came from. The fashion for ruins was also hugely popular in 18th-century England. Back then, people were leaving the land to work in factories. Similarly, as our factories close, we’re developing a nostalgic appreciation for manufacturing.

EBW’s offerings are slated to include a sustainable garden center, farmers’ market, demonstration gardens and kitchens, conference and event facilities, community bike space, art exhibition areas, and programs for families and kids. 

The Welcome Hut — Dwell.com slideshow here — was designed so that it could be relocated elsewhere on the property, to serve other purposes as needed. 

(spotted on Twitter, via Dwell’s Miyoko Ohtake, @miyokoohtake)

OUT: Coffee shops as living rooms IN: Coffee shops as factories

washingtonpoststyle:

Coffee shops in Brooklyn are redesigning their interiors to make them less comfy, trying to put an end to endless couch-surfing by people who have confused “coffee shop” with “my living room,” reports the New York Times.

Nominations for replacement public socializing spaces?

Libraries? Cupcake shops?

Libraries. (Free access. Community hubs, many of which now feature coffee carts or cafes. Enough said.)

PSA: PARK(ing) Day — “an annual, worldwide event that inspires city dwellers everywhere to  transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public  good” — is one month away.

PSA: PARK(ing) Day — “an annual, worldwide event that inspires city dwellers everywhere to transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public good” — is one month away.

Via unconsumption:

A Discarded Chair Finds Its Way Home Again - NYTimes.com
Here’s something to think about: Wouldn’t this chair’s “story” be a good one to record and share via a service/app (using QR Codes) such as Itizen, described by Rob at Murketing.com and here  on Unconsumption?!

Via unconsumption:

A Discarded Chair Finds Its Way Home Again - NYTimes.com

Here’s something to think about: Wouldn’t this chair’s “story” be a good one to record and share via a service/app (using QR Codes) such as Itizen, described by Rob at Murketing.com and here on Unconsumption?!

Via (me on) unconsumption:

“A funny thing happened after Keiji Asakura suggested the creation of a vegetable garden in the middle of the concrete corridor and skyscraper canyon that is downtown Houston.
 
“It actually came to fruition — with a swiftness that stunned the landscape architect and the nonprofit group [Urban Harvest] that shared his vision.
“Now, a mere two months later, herbs, vegetables and flowers are flourishing on a bustling city street. A community has been forged among co-workers and strangers who once did little more than brush shoulders on crowded elevators. Skateboarders and street people have grown protective of the fledgling plants.
“And this experiment, which involves nonprofit groups, the city’s Sustainability Office and employees of the Department of Public Works and Engineering, has become living proof that urban gardens can take root in the unlikeliest of places.
“The ‘Downtown Houston Container Vegetable Garden Project’ is … part of a trend in cities across the country, where once-vacant lots, apartment building windowsills and rooftops are being turned into community gardens which help provide fresh produce for the gardeners, farmers markets, and for food banks serving the needy.
“We haven’t heard of any other city doing this the way we have,” said [the city’s new sustainability director Laura] Spanjian. “The goal is to show people that they can grow local vegetables anywhere. We want to be a model for other cities and other businesses.”
 “It adds greenery and beauty in an unexpected place,” said [Derrick] Neal [of the Public Works Department]. “This is what gardening is about — totally ordinary people doing extraordinary things.”
Full story: Urban Gardening Experiment Blossoms in Houston - ABC News
Other community garden/urban farming posts here, here, and here.

Via (me on) unconsumption:

“A funny thing happened after Keiji Asakura suggested the creation of a vegetable garden in the middle of the concrete corridor and skyscraper canyon that is downtown Houston.

“It actually came to fruition — with a swiftness that stunned the landscape architect and the nonprofit group [Urban Harvest] that shared his vision.

“Now, a mere two months later, herbs, vegetables and flowers are flourishing on a bustling city street. A community has been forged among co-workers and strangers who once did little more than brush shoulders on crowded elevators. Skateboarders and street people have grown protective of the fledgling plants.

“And this experiment, which involves nonprofit groups, the city’s Sustainability Office and employees of the Department of Public Works and Engineering, has become living proof that urban gardens can take root in the unlikeliest of places.

“The ‘Downtown Houston Container Vegetable Garden Project’ is … part of a trend in cities across the country, where once-vacant lots, apartment building windowsills and rooftops are being turned into community gardens which help provide fresh produce for the gardeners, farmers markets, and for food banks serving the needy.

“We haven’t heard of any other city doing this the way we have,” said [the city’s new sustainability director Laura] Spanjian. “The goal is to show people that they can grow local vegetables anywhere. We want to be a model for other cities and other businesses.”

 “It adds greenery and beauty in an unexpected place,” said [Derrick] Neal [of the Public Works Department]. “This is what gardening is about — totally ordinary people doing extraordinary things.”

Full story: Urban Gardening Experiment Blossoms in Houston - ABC News

Other community garden/urban farming posts herehere, and here.

In #Loispalooza news (a.k.a. Houston Museum of Natural Science “Lois”-the-corpse-flower “watch,” day 16):
On the HMNS blog, Zac, the affable horticulturalist (now on Twitter — @hortzac), offers an update regarding today’s introduction of ethylene gas, a natural “hormone” (administered via a bag of overripe bananas) that is hoped will help nudge Lois’s blossom to open, and the closing of the museum from midnight tonight until 9:00 a.m. Saturday (read: break time for Lois), a change from the 24-hour schedule.
Also: Erin’s blog entry recaps Wednesday’s and Thursday’s haiku tweet-fest, which yours truly was inspired to instigate.
In case you missed it: my Wednesday, July 14, post describing Lois, her significance.
Stay tuned.

In #Loispalooza news (a.k.a. Houston Museum of Natural Science “Lois”-the-corpse-flower “watch,” day 16):

On the HMNS blog, Zac, the affable horticulturalist (now on Twitter — @hortzac), offers an update regarding today’s introduction of ethylene gas, a natural “hormone” (administered via a bag of overripe bananas) that is hoped will help nudge Lois’s blossom to open, and the closing of the museum from midnight tonight until 9:00 a.m. Saturday (read: break time for Lois), a change from the 24-hour schedule.

Also: Erin’s blog entry recaps Wednesday’s and Thursday’s haiku tweet-fest, which yours truly was inspired to instigate.

In case you missed it: my Wednesday, July 14, post describing Lois, her significance.

Stay tuned.

Via bmdesign:

Conflict Kitchen is a take-out restaurant that only serves cuisine from countries that the United States is in conflict with.


The restaurant’s Web site provides further explanation that’s worth a read:
"Public events, performances, and discussions about Iranian culture and conflict will be held at The Waffle Shop, 124 S. Highland Avenue, adjacent to Conflict Kitchen. Conflict Kitchen operates out of the Waffle Shop’s kitchen door and is an extension of the Waffle Shop’s unique programming. Each Conflict Kitchen iteration will be augmented by events, talks, and discussion groups about the culture, politics, and issues at stake with each county we focus on.
The Waffle Shop is a neighborhood restaurant that produces and broadcasts a live-streaming talk show with its customers, operates a changeable storytelling billboard on its roof, and runs a take-out window that sells food from countries engaged in conflict with the U.S. The shop is a public lab that brings together people from all walks of life to engage in dialogue, experimentation and the co-production of culture. The project functions as a classroom for students from Carnegie Mellon University, an eatery, a TV production studio, a social catalyst, and a business. Our customers are our funders, audience, and participants as we film during open hours, inviting interested patrons to express their unique opinions and personalities.”

Via bmdesign:

Conflict Kitchen is a take-out restaurant that only serves cuisine from countries that the United States is in conflict with.

The restaurant’s Web site provides further explanation that’s worth a read:

"Public events, performances, and discussions about Iranian culture and conflict will be held at The Waffle Shop, 124 S. Highland Avenue, adjacent to Conflict Kitchen. Conflict Kitchen operates out of the Waffle Shop’s kitchen door and is an extension of the Waffle Shop’s unique programming. Each Conflict Kitchen iteration will be augmented by events, talks, and discussion groups about the culture, politics, and issues at stake with each county we focus on.

The Waffle Shop is a neighborhood restaurant that produces and broadcasts a live-streaming talk show with its customers, operates a changeable storytelling billboard on its roof, and runs a take-out window that sells food from countries engaged in conflict with the U.S. The shop is a public lab that brings together people from all walks of life to engage in dialogue, experimentation and the co-production of culture. The project functions as a classroom for students from Carnegie Mellon University, an eatery, a TV production studio, a social catalyst, and a business. Our customers are our funders, audience, and participants as we film during open hours, inviting interested patrons to express their unique opinions and personalities.”

Reposting my unconsumption post:

 
Grocery Getters:  The Farm Proper Plants Real Food in Shopping Carts — FastCompany.com
Alissa Walker writes:

Urban farms are sprouting in vacant lots and forgotten walls all over the country. But a farm in San Diego, California employs another type of abandoned real estate: The shopping cart. Firms Set & Drift and mi-workshop have used a signature blight on the urban landscape to create a mobile garden concept called The Farm Proper in the city’s Barrio Logan neighborhood. 
Abandoned carts gathered from the neighborhood have been lined with burlap sacks donated by a local coffee retailer and packed with plants. Carts deemed inoperable have been anchored permanently at the space, and in this case, planted into a kind of bean pole teepee. The image of the supermarket staple serving as a planter for fresh food serves up some pretty nice symbolism as well. 
It’s the meals-on-wheels element that really makes this kind of gardening exciting. One can imagine how banged-up carts could be collected from the streets, brought here for planting and then be wheeled away to permanently park at the homes of deserving families. Another idea, which was already demonstrated at a Farm Proper potluck, could bring healthy lunches to local workers: With the proper combination of crops, these mobile carts could roam the streets as super-fresh, pick-your-own salad bars.

Reposting my unconsumption post:

Grocery Getters:  The Farm Proper Plants Real Food in Shopping Carts — FastCompany.com

Alissa Walker writes:

Urban farms are sprouting in vacant lots and forgotten walls all over the country. But a farm in San Diego, California employs another type of abandoned real estate: The shopping cart. Firms Set & Drift and mi-workshop have used a signature blight on the urban landscape to create a mobile garden concept called The Farm Proper in the city’s Barrio Logan neighborhood. 

Abandoned carts gathered from the neighborhood have been lined with burlap sacks donated by a local coffee retailer and packed with plants. Carts deemed inoperable have been anchored permanently at the space, and in this case, planted into a kind of bean pole teepee. The image of the supermarket staple serving as a planter for fresh food serves up some pretty nice symbolism as well. 

It’s the meals-on-wheels element that really makes this kind of gardening exciting. One can imagine how banged-up carts could be collected from the streets, brought here for planting and then be wheeled away to permanently park at the homes of deserving families. Another idea, which was already demonstrated at a Farm Proper potluck, could bring healthy lunches to local workers: With the proper combination of crops, these mobile carts could roam the streets as super-fresh, pick-your-own salad bars.