Posts tagged branding

digg:

Oreo won the Super Bowl blackout. 

Agreed.
Also noteworthy: At the end of Oreo’s library-centered “Whisper Fight” commercial (anyone else turned off by the violence in it?!), viewers were driven to Instagram.
However, on Instagram: Oreo’s recreating Instagram fans’ photos into either cookie or cream renditions — in conjunction with fans tagging their Instagram photos with #cookiethis or #cremethis? That’s just weird. 
May I present, from Oreo’s Instagram gallery, exhibit A: Oreo’s photo of an Instagram user’s mouth … rendered by Oreo in “Oreo creme.” 
Um, weird, right?
I rest my case.

digg:

Oreo won the Super Bowl blackout. 

Agreed.

Also noteworthy: At the end of Oreo’s library-centered “Whisper Fight” commercial (anyone else turned off by the violence in it?!), viewers were driven to Instagram.

However, on Instagram: Oreo’s recreating Instagram fans’ photos into either cookie or cream renditions — in conjunction with fans tagging their Instagram photos with #cookiethis or #cremethis? That’s just weird. 

May I present, from Oreo’s Instagram gallery, exhibit A: Oreo’s photo of an Instagram user’s mouth … rendered by Oreo in “Oreo creme.” 

Um, weird, right?

I rest my case.

How To Sell A $1 Snow Globe For $59: The Real ROI Of Brand Storytelling | Fast Company

The founders of the website Significantobjects.com, a site devoted to quantifying the bottom-line power of story at a product level, say, “Stories are such a powerful driver…that their effect on any given [product’s] subjective value can be measured objectively.” The website is home to an experiment that goes like this: the founders buy thrift store, garage sale, and flea market products, always cheap, no more than a couple dollars at most. Then, they hire a writer to compose a fictional story about the product, imbuing it with heritage, history, and ostensibly, value. The once-valueless products, accompanied by their new stories, are then sold auction-style on eBay. The difference between the original purchase price and story price is recorded as the objective value of that story.

The takeaway results for the first 100 products bought, storied, and then resold on eBay are poignant and telling. On average, the original product price was $1.29. But the average resale price after a story was added grew to a staggering $36.12. All in all, the experiment shows that even at a micro level, story can increase product value by a whopping 2,706 percent (or more, in the case of this snow globe).


Procter & Gamble Co., General Mills Inc., Hostess Brands Inc. and PepsiCo Inc. are pulling old package designs out of their archives for brands like Tide, Cheerios and Doritos and bringing them back to store shelves. Smaller companies and start-ups are using fonts, colors or designs that evoke the past on their labels.
The move is a U-turn from labels cluttered with specific claims like “easy pour spout” or “better tasting” to packaging that plays on the emotions. Over time, labels have gotten busier because computers allowed for complex designs and marketers wanted products to stand out on crowded shelves.
"We got to the point where you couldn’t add one more bling thing to a package," says Christine Mau, director of design at Kimberly-Clark Corp., the maker of Kleenex and Huggies, among other items.
The retro movement is driven, in part, by consumer-goods companies feeling pressure from retailers’ private-label products, which are generally less expensive. 
Manufacturers also say they are hoping to benefit from consumers’ generally sunny impression of the past and stand out in a sea of modern, glossy packages.

Full story: New! Improved! (and Very Old) - WSJ.com

Procter & Gamble Co., General Mills Inc., Hostess Brands Inc. and PepsiCo Inc. are pulling old package designs out of their archives for brands like Tide, Cheerios and Doritos and bringing them back to store shelves. Smaller companies and start-ups are using fonts, colors or designs that evoke the past on their labels.

The move is a U-turn from labels cluttered with specific claims like “easy pour spout” or “better tasting” to packaging that plays on the emotions. Over time, labels have gotten busier because computers allowed for complex designs and marketers wanted products to stand out on crowded shelves.

"We got to the point where you couldn’t add one more bling thing to a package," says Christine Mau, director of design at Kimberly-Clark Corp., the maker of Kleenex and Huggies, among other items.

The retro movement is driven, in part, by consumer-goods companies feeling pressure from retailers’ private-label products, which are generally less expensive. 

Manufacturers also say they are hoping to benefit from consumers’ generally sunny impression of the past and stand out in a sea of modern, glossy packages.

Full story: New! Improved! (and Very Old) - WSJ.com

Reimagining Toronto’s public transit system:
The Toronto Transit Commission is said to be considering the idea of selling naming rights for its subway lines and stations. In response, the helpful folks at Torontoist have chimed in to offer several station-renaming suggestions, including one for Christie station — to be known as “Mr. Christie,” in acknowledgment of Kraft Foods’ Mr. Christie’s cookie brand. 
Read the rest (including Ossingston station, dubbed “Hugo Bossington”): Welcome to Your New SUBWAY(TM) System, Toronto.
Well done, Torontoist.

Reimagining Toronto’s public transit system:

The Toronto Transit Commission is said to be considering the idea of selling naming rights for its subway lines and stations. In response, the helpful folks at Torontoist have chimed in to offer several station-renaming suggestions, including one for Christie station — to be known as “Mr. Christie,” in acknowledgment of Kraft Foods’ Mr. Christie’s cookie brand

Read the rest (including Ossingston station, dubbed “Hugo Bossington”): Welcome to Your New SUBWAY(TM) System, Toronto.

Well done, Torontoist.

Via dachesterfrench:

The new Gap logo. Strange move. I think this sort of “modernizing” rebranding is almost always a mistake unless a company has just sponsored a genocide or something. -D.A.
davemorin:

A sad day for iconic brand design.
Mind the GAP! | down with design


Of course, there’s the accompanying rogue Twitter account, http://twitter.com/gaplogo, that cropped up yesterday (Oct. 6) and went from 275 to 375 followers overnight.
Oct. 7 afternoon update: A logo redesign contest, coordinated by Scott Hansen, with one hundred and forty-three entries (and counting), is in the works.

Via dachesterfrench:

The new Gap logo. Strange move. I think this sort of “modernizing” rebranding is almost always a mistake unless a company has just sponsored a genocide or something. -D.A.

davemorin:

A sad day for iconic brand design.

Mind the GAP! | down with design

Of course, there’s the accompanying rogue Twitter account, http://twitter.com/gaplogo, that cropped up yesterday (Oct. 6) and went from 275 to 375 followers overnight.

Oct. 7 afternoon update: A logo redesign contest, coordinated by Scott Hansen, with one hundred and forty-three entries (and counting), is in the works.

I wonder if Rob Walker (whose insightful posts can be found at Murketing.tumblr.com, Unconsumption.tumblr.com, Murketing.com, @notrobwalker, and @significobs, among other places) is aware that this New York Times review of his book, “Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are,” is making the rounds on Tumblr.
Via szymon:

Branded by Farhad Manjoo

I wonder if Rob Walker (whose insightful posts can be found at Murketing.tumblr.com, Unconsumption.tumblr.com, Murketing.com, @notrobwalker, and @significobs, among other places) is aware that this New York Times review of his book, “Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are,” is making the rounds on Tumblr.

Via szymon:

Branded by Farhad Manjoo

I’ve been watching this Pedigree UK adoption drive unfold over the past few weeks. Pedigree revealed “Charlie’s” story online via four sequential videos posted to YouTube. When views reached a particular number, the next video was unleashed. Video sharing was encouraged to boost views and awareness of both Pedigree’s campaign and the gravity of animal abandonment. 

Watch the four clips, and I think you will agree: every dog matters.

Mood lifting. Trust me.

[TBWA\Chiat\Day’s spot for Pedigree]

Storytelling. Tugging at heartstrings.

And promoting coffee.

Well done, Tim Hortons.

March 8 update: Well, someone deleted the commercial from YouTube. Here’s a link to the spot on Tim Hortons’s Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=1191305952972

Glad to share Pepsi's Refresh Everything toolkit (click here to view the PDF)

Today’s the first day to submit ideas for potential projects to be considered for Pepsi grant support. For FAQs and additional information about Pepsi’s grant program, visit the Pepsi Refresh Project’s "How It Works" section of refresheverything.com

Fun! 

Piano staircase: A component of Volkswagen’s ’fun' initiative — changing behavior through fun: http://thefuntheory.com       

Would this encourage you to take the stairs?

Branding evolution: I am showing this to everybody here: @Pepsi’s forward-thinking example of social media promo+packaging (pic via @jkarpf @PepsiRaw) — love it!

Branding evolution: I am showing this to everybody here: @Pepsi’s forward-thinking example of social media promo+packaging (pic via @jkarpf @PepsiRaw) — love it!