Posts tagged arts

Arts matters:

From Toronto’s Creative Trust:

The results of Creative Trust’s Audience Engagement Survey – a first-time, collaborative initiative by Toronto’s [small to mid-size] creative performing arts companies – were released today and are available on our website [PDF here]. The survey made it possible for 20 participating companies to hear directly from their audiences on what motivates them to attend and what helps them connect more deeply with the work they see on stage. The initiative brought music, theatre, opera and dance companies together to learn how to design and plan programs and activities – both individually and collectively – which intensify the impact of their audiences’ experience and stimulate attendance

(via Survey of 3,662 Toronto audience members released today)

A job-killing plan for arts and culture?

Via hydeordie:

If you gave me a buck, and next year I returned $18.75 to you, would you think that was a good deal?

I would. With savings accounts, money markets and even stocks yielding just a few percentage points on investments these days, a return in excess of 18% is pretty staggering.

Yet, that’s what happens with federal support for arts and culture. It pays for itself 18 times over.

Federal support includes partial matches to state arts agencies, underwriting the National Gallery of Art and the Kennedy Center in Washington, the nationwide programs of the endowments for the arts and humanities and much more. My colleague Mike Boehm reports that, all together, federal arts and culture spending currently totals about $1.6 billion a year, not counting construction budgets.

Meanwhile, revenues to federal, state and local coffers related to that spending totals $30 billion annually — more than 18 times the outlay. The income derives from taxes paid by the 5.7 million workers in the nation’s culture industry, many of whose jobs are sustained by federal support.

Pretty good deal — especially when stacked up against agribusiness subsidies, military expenditures and other corporate financing from Washington.

Nonetheless, congressional Republicans are once again proposing job-killing cuts to the federal arts budget. They aim to slash it, even zeroing out tiny agencies such as the NEA and NEH, as a report last week from the Republican Study Committee proposed. In these scary, economically strapped times, what passes for an argument is their claim that “we can’t afford it.” But the numbers show the argument is just fear-mongering bunk.

Full LA Times post here.

Musical mash-up-of-the-month: Shaquille O’Neal making his conducting debut last night (December 20) at the Boston Pops Orchestra’s holiday concert.

I heard about this last week and wondered about the back story. The Boston Symphony Orchestra’s Web site offers last week’s press release, but no additional information (unfortunately).

Tell me (Molly) if you find any info telling us how this event came to be!

(via youngmanhattanite)

Via dachesterfrench:

Awesome stage for Verdi’ s opera “A Masked Ball” in 1999.
(via The Telegraph)

Via dachesterfrench:

Awesome stage for Verdi’ s opera “A Masked Ball” in 1999.

(via The Telegraph)

 
More QR Code stuff — with possible applications for arts organizations:
The description on Designboom, where I read about the project, is a bit confusing, but I think I get the picture:
The “QR Cloud Project,” designed by Golfstromen to be a temporary installation (starting in July 2009) in Amsterdam, consists of seven QR Codes placed on an unoccupied building. When read on a mobile device, the codes reveal poetry or sayings written specifically for the project. The project’s goals include introducing QR Codes to a broader audience and experimenting with the technology as an art form.

More QR Code stuff — with possible applications for arts organizations:

The description on Designboom, where I read about the project, is a bit confusing, but I think I get the picture:

The “QR Cloud Project,” designed by Golfstromen to be a temporary installation (starting in July 2009) in Amsterdam, consists of seven QR Codes placed on an unoccupied building. When read on a mobile device, the codes reveal poetry or sayings written specifically for the project. The project’s goals include introducing QR Codes to a broader audience and experimenting with the technology as an art form.

This is cool — museum use of QR Codes:

QRATOR will create new models for public engagement and informal learning in museums using handheld mobile devices and new interactive digital labels.

The project will create small printed tags (QR codes) for museum objects, linked to an online database. These will allow the public to view curated information and, most notably, to send back their own interpretation and views via their own mobile phone or interactive digital label. Their thoughts subsequently become part of the object’s history and ultimately the display itself via the interactive label system, allowing the display of comments and information directly next to the artefacts.

The project will be based around technology developed at UCL’s [University College London] Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis and the Tales of Things site, which has developed a method for cataloguing physical objects online which could make museums and galleries a more interactive experience. QRATOR takes the technology a step further bringing the opportunity to move the discussion of objects direct to the museum label and onto users’ mobile phones, allowing the creation of a sustainable, world-leading model for two-way public interaction in museum spaces.

Related: this post from September describing arts organizations’ possible application of QR Codes, encouraging public engagement, deepening relationships with patrons; and an earlier post regarding story-telling and -sharing (involves Tales of Things).

Via utnereader:

With surreal robotic voices, two digi-panda bears explain why it is so hard for non-profit arts organizations to get funding. The short animation is frustrating, darkly funny, and informative. Read some commentary from Arts Journal here.

I tried watching this video last week, but didn’t get very far into it because I found the “voices” so annoying-sounding.  Other videos in this series are difficult to watch/listen to for the same reason. Perhaps the creator’s future work will be a bit easier on the ear.

The Mayors' Institute on City Design releases "Creative Placemaking" report

Creative Placemaking is a resource for mayors, arts organizations, the philanthropic sector, and others interested in understanding strategies for leveraging the arts to help shape and revitalize the physical, social, and economic character of neighborhoods, cities, and towns.

In the words of the report, “Creative placemaking animates public and private spaces, rejuvenates structures and streetscapes, improves local business viability and public safety, and brings diverse people together to celebrate, inspire, and be inspired.”

Partners involved with the Mayors’ Institute on City Design’s report include the National Endowment for the Arts, U.S. Conference of Mayors, and American Architectural Foundation.

What attaches people to their communities?

Why do people love where they live? Why does it matter? 

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Gallup partnered to survey 43,000 individuals in 26 communities (where Knight owned newspapers), and summarized their findings in the Soul of the Community report. The study, conducted over three years, was designed “to find out what emotionally attaches people to a community, what makes them want to put down roots and build a life there.” Overall, such attachment helps to boost economic growth.

The top drivers that attach “people to place” include things that relate directly to daily quality of life: “social offerings, such as entertainment venues and places to meet, openness (how welcoming a place is), and the area’s aesthetics (its physical beauty and green spaces).”

For complete survey findings, visit www.soulofthecommunity.org.

What Attaches People to Their Communities? | Knight Soul of the Community #SOTC

Via keiren-smith:

youwillbeassimilated:

Via bookshelves:

El Ateneo Grand Splendid bookstore in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Converted from a theatre.


Oh.Oh.Oh. I want to go to there.

Bookshelf-of-the-week.

Via keiren-smith:

youwillbeassimilated:

Via bookshelves:

El Ateneo Grand Splendid bookstore in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Converted from a theatre.

Oh.Oh.Oh. I want to go to there.

Bookshelf-of-the-week.