Posts tagged architecture

wnyc:

Thanks to a new city law, all construction sites must now have a “viewing panel” that lets you peek in and see what’s going on. We explained the law on the Brian Lehrer Show blog, and asked you to snap a picture through that little diamond-shaped peephole. Now, here are our favorite of your photos.
-Jody, BL Show-

Gotta say I like this.

wnyc:

Thanks to a new city law, all construction sites must now have a “viewing panel” that lets you peek in and see what’s going on. We explained the law on the Brian Lehrer Show blog, and asked you to snap a picture through that little diamond-shaped peephole. Now, here are our favorite of your photos.

-Jody, BL Show-

Gotta say I like this.

theatlantic:

A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.
Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]


Enjoyed reading this.

theatlantic:

A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.

Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]

Enjoyed reading this.

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

lettersfromhere:

The 10 best fictional architects | Culture | The Observer

I’d add the lead character from Peter Greenaway’s 1980s film “The Belly of an Architect.”

lettersfromhere:

The 10 best fictional architects | Culture | The Observer

I’d add the lead character from Peter Greenaway’s 1980s film “The Belly of an Architect.”

subtilitas:

Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Goverment Center in Goshen NY, completed in 1971 (via), is slated to be demolished, and replaced by that marvel of faux-historical-factory-colonialism below.

File under “supporting the case for historic preservation.”


We’re beyond the point of a fresh coat of paint and a new sales pitch. If we’re going to continue to hold on to the single-family home, we need to transform it. There is a demand for smaller, more energy-efficient homes in less car-dependent neighborhoods; all aspects of the industry, from designers to lenders to planners to consumers, should meet it. In this era of anti-government fervor, subsidizing the American Dream isn’t an option; transforming it is the only one we’ve got.

(via Shifting the Suburban Paradigm - NYTimes.com)

We’re beyond the point of a fresh coat of paint and a new sales pitch. If we’re going to continue to hold on to the single-family home, we need to transform it. There is a demand for smaller, more energy-efficient homes in less car-dependent neighborhoods; all aspects of the industry, from designers to lenders to planners to consumers, should meet it. In this era of anti-government fervor, subsidizing the American Dream isn’t an option; transforming it is the only one we’ve got.

(via Shifting the Suburban Paradigm - NYTimes.com)

Via unconsumption:

The Houston artistic team of Dan Havel and Dean Ruck is at it again. (Previous mentions here and here.) Thanks to their handiwork, another old bungalow slated for demolition is being transformed into architectural artwork.
The public art project, which Havel and Ruck designed to function as a stage, is a temporary centerpiece in a new pocket park in Houston’s Fifth Ward, a neighborhood developed in the late 1800s. The Fifth Ward went into decline in the 1970s; in recent years, the area’s been undergoing redevelopment and revitalization. [Side note: Former residents include Congresswoman Barbara Jordan and musician Arnett Cobb.]
Photo above via Fifth Ward Jam - Houston Arts Alliance. 
Pre-deconstruction photo below (by Havel Ruck Projects) via Swamplot.com. 

For additional photos and information, see this Swamplot post. 

Houston!

Via unconsumption:

The Houston artistic team of Dan Havel and Dean Ruck is at it again. (Previous mentions here and here.) Thanks to their handiwork, another old bungalow slated for demolition is being transformed into architectural artwork.

The public art project, which Havel and Ruck designed to function as a stage, is a temporary centerpiece in a new pocket park in Houston’s Fifth Ward, a neighborhood developed in the late 1800s. The Fifth Ward went into decline in the 1970s; in recent years, the area’s been undergoing redevelopment and revitalization. [Side note: Former residents include Congresswoman Barbara Jordan and musician Arnett Cobb.]

Photo above via Fifth Ward Jam - Houston Arts Alliance

Pre-deconstruction photo below (by Havel Ruck Projects) via Swamplot.com

For additional photos and information, see this Swamplot post

Houston!

Via emergentfutures:

Flexible condos can be reconfigured and resized
It’s a fact of life that people’s needs change over time, and that’s as true in housing as any other industry. Aiming to create condominiums that are flexible enough to accommodate some of that change, Canadian architectural firm Sweeny Sterling Finlayson & Co. has created a new, modular design for living spaces that allows them to adapt when needed.
Full Story: Springwise

Via emergentfutures:

Flexible condos can be reconfigured and resized

It’s a fact of life that people’s needs change over time, and that’s as true in housing as any other industry. Aiming to create condominiums that are flexible enough to accommodate some of that change, Canadian architectural firm Sweeny Sterling Finlayson & Co. has created a new, modular design for living spaces that allows them to adapt when needed.

Full Story: Springwise

Meeting a friend for brunch on the east side of town gave me good reason to drive around the area east of downtown Houston (east of Minute Maid Park, for baseball fans!). I wish I knew the back story behind this building, which appears to be empty, and its ghost signs.
Among the words I can make out are “No dust. No dirt.” And: “5 ¢.” “Metro.” Odd combo. 
(Taken with instagram, with no filter.)

Meeting a friend for brunch on the east side of town gave me good reason to drive around the area east of downtown Houston (east of Minute Maid Park, for baseball fans!). I wish I knew the back story behind this building, which appears to be empty, and its ghost signs.

Among the words I can make out are “No dust. No dirt.” And: “5 ¢.” “Metro.” Odd combo. 

(Taken with instagram, with no filter.)

At last, pleased to add this pic to my ghost sign series! … Had time today to drive by this building — the former Waddell House Furnishing Co. building — before I leave this side of Houston. Sadly, it’s a disused building. What future does it have?
Bonus: captured a bird in flight!
(Taken with instagram, with gotham filter.)

At last, pleased to add this pic to my ghost sign series! … Had time today to drive by this building — the former Waddell House Furnishing Co. building — before I leave this side of Houston. Sadly, it’s a disused building. What future does it have?

Bonus: captured a bird in flight!

(Taken with instagram, with gotham filter.)

Prominent Houstonians' ideas on what to do with Dome

lettersfromhere:

I find it totally beyond imagination that the Astrodome could cease to exist. This article is a must-read for anybody who believes, as I do, that the Dome is a crucial piece of physical history.

Hello? Anybody?

Anyway: They shoulda asked The Art Guys for ideas, too.

(Thanks Molly!)

Agreed. 

Via contained:

Via unconsumption:

A collaboration exploring the use of shipping containers as affordable, sustainable, energy-independent housing receives federal grant

It may not be a McMansion, but the Rhode Island School of Design, Brown’s Rhode Island Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship [RI-CIE], and two state-based architects have partnered in a first-time collaboration to design and potentially commercialize an off-the-grid, sustainable and energy-efficient home from [used] shipping containers. A class of RISD students this spring is researching and developing design plans for the sustainable home, and if the idea is judged viable, experts from RI-CIE will assist in finding the best avenues to take the homes to market.
“This collaboration between RISD and Brown has great potential to create jobs and provide affordable, sustainable housing … ,” said U.S. Sen. Jack Reed, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Full story: Live in a Shipping Container, Say RISD, Brown | GoLocalProv. 
The two participating architects, Brown grad Peter Gill Case and RISD alum Joe Haskett, whose company is collaborating on the project, were involved with a multi-story shipping container office project in Providence, described in this earlier Unconsumption post.
I am a proponent of using rehabbed shipping containers for residential and commercial purposes, and look forward to following the RISD-Brown project’s progress.
Related: Find other shipping container-oriented Unconsumption posts here.

The fact that the project received a federal grant (akin to a Good Housekeeping stamp of approval!) gives it much credibility. If a viable design results from this project, it could provide an attractive option in the housing mix of the future. Hope there’s one or more successful outcomes from this initiative.

Reblogging myself so this post shows up here, in addition to appearing on the Contained and Unconsumption sites. :)

Via contained:

Via unconsumption:

A collaboration exploring the use of shipping containers as affordable, sustainable, energy-independent housing receives federal grant

It may not be a McMansion, but the Rhode Island School of Design, Brown’s Rhode Island Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship [RI-CIE], and two state-based architects have partnered in a first-time collaboration to design and potentially commercialize an off-the-grid, sustainable and energy-efficient home from [used] shipping containers. A class of RISD students this spring is researching and developing design plans for the sustainable home, and if the idea is judged viable, experts from RI-CIE will assist in finding the best avenues to take the homes to market.

“This collaboration between RISD and Brown has great potential to create jobs and provide affordable, sustainable housing … ,” said U.S. Sen. Jack Reed, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Full story: Live in a Shipping Container, Say RISD, Brown | GoLocalProv

The two participating architects, Brown grad Peter Gill Case and RISD alum Joe Haskett, whose company is collaborating on the project, were involved with a multi-story shipping container office project in Providence, described in this earlier Unconsumption post.

I am a proponent of using rehabbed shipping containers for residential and commercial purposes, and look forward to following the RISD-Brown project’s progress.

Related: Find other shipping container-oriented Unconsumption posts here.

The fact that the project received a federal grant (akin to a Good Housekeeping stamp of approval!) gives it much credibility. If a viable design results from this project, it could provide an attractive option in the housing mix of the future. Hope there’s one or more successful outcomes from this initiative.

Reblogging myself so this post shows up here, in addition to appearing on the Contained and Unconsumption sites. :)