Posts tagged Texas

Bluebonnets — on a street corner in central Houston — *not* in a spot where you’d expect to see Texas wildflowers growing. What a great sight! 
The street corner serves as a METRO bus stop.
[Photo snapped by yours truly (mollyblock) on my trusty iPhone 5 on April 17, 2014, and posted on Flickr here.]

Bluebonnets — on a street corner in central Houston — *not* in a spot where you’d expect to see Texas wildflowers growing. What a great sight! 

The street corner serves as a METRO bus stop.

[Photo snapped by yours truly (mollyblock) on my trusty iPhone 5 on April 17, 2014, and posted on Flickr here.]

tinypmsmatch:

Pantone 2725 color match. A Blue Bonnet flower. Spring is officially here in Texas!

Today’s spot o’ color: Bluebonnet blue. 

tinypmsmatch:

Pantone 2725 color match. A Blue Bonnet flower. Spring is officially here in Texas!

Today’s spot o’ color: Bluebonnet blue. 

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 
I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!
This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.
(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock) 
Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here. 

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 

I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!

This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.

(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock

Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

Good food news: 
Texas Monthly Hires Full-Time Barbecue Editor - NYTimes.com

Most important, he [Daniel Vaughn, who has eaten at more than 600 barbecue places since 2007] had just decided to take a sizable pay cut and quit his job as an architect at a respected Dallas firm to devote all of his time and gastrological energy to writing about Texas barbecue.

Good food news: 

Texas Monthly Hires Full-Time Barbecue Editor - NYTimes.com

Most important, he [Daniel Vaughn, who has eaten at more than 600 barbecue places since 2007] had just decided to take a sizable pay cut and quit his job as an architect at a respected Dallas firm to devote all of his time and gastrological energy to writing about Texas barbecue.

In landmark art preservation news: 

It’s hard to miss the 70-foot-tall blue saxophone as you drive down Richmond Avenue [in Houston].
Its name is Smokesax, and it has been at that location on 6025 Richmond for the past 20 years. But Wednesday, the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art, a local folk art organization [mentioned previously here], announced it is going to acquire the oversize horn, which is made out of car parts, oil field pipes and a surfboard, as well as an entire Volkswagen Beetle that forms the U-joint at its base.
The big brass was built by legendary Texas artist Bob Wade as a special installation for Billy Blues Bar & Grill. It was fully restored three years ago, and the current property owners, Kensinger Properties Ltd., said they wanted the Orange Show to ensure the piece would be preserved for future generations. 
The saxophone will be removed from its current location at 10 a.m. on Feb. 28. The process to remove the massive piece will take a full day. Then, Smokesax will begin its 13-mile journey from Richmond Avenue to Munger Street. Artist Bob Wade will be overseeing the entire removal and transportation. Once at the Orange Show, it will be housed in the organization’s warehouse until an exact location has been chosen for permanent display.

(via Orange Show Center for Visionary Art to acquire Smokesax - Houston Business Journal)

In landmark art preservation news: 

It’s hard to miss the 70-foot-tall blue saxophone as you drive down Richmond Avenue [in Houston].

Its name is Smokesax, and it has been at that location on 6025 Richmond for the past 20 years. But Wednesday, the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art, a local folk art organization [mentioned previously here], announced it is going to acquire the oversize horn, which is made out of car parts, oil field pipes and a surfboard, as well as an entire Volkswagen Beetle that forms the U-joint at its base.

The big brass was built by legendary Texas artist Bob Wade as a special installation for Billy Blues Bar & Grill. It was fully restored three years ago, and the current property owners, Kensinger Properties Ltd., said they wanted the Orange Show to ensure the piece would be preserved for future generations.

The saxophone will be removed from its current location at 10 a.m. on Feb. 28. The process to remove the massive piece will take a full day. Then, Smokesax will begin its 13-mile journey from Richmond Avenue to Munger Street. Artist Bob Wade will be overseeing the entire removal and transportation. Once at the Orange Show, it will be housed in the organization’s warehouse until an exact location has been chosen for permanent display.

(via Orange Show Center for Visionary Art to acquire Smokesax - Houston Business Journal)

Missing today’s Houston Social Media Week #Instacrawl. Instead, I’m hanging out with great City of Houston staff and talented Houston-area students who are interested in learning more about recycling. We’re judging students’ work in using salvaged materials to decorate recycling carts. Love this one covered in plastic bottles and cardboard. Not a typical Saturday, but a good one!

Missing today’s Houston Social Media Week #Instacrawl. Instead, I’m hanging out with great City of Houston staff and talented Houston-area students who are interested in learning more about recycling. We’re judging students’ work in using salvaged materials to decorate recycling carts. Love this one covered in plastic bottles and cardboard. Not a typical Saturday, but a good one!

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

Abandoned, in Mexia, Texas. (Taken with Instagram)

Abandoned, in Mexia, Texas. (Taken with Instagram)

Farther north on Broadway Street: San Antonio’s Pig Stand restaurant, one of only a handful left in the chain. (Some 130 restaurants opened in the 1920s-30s.) From the Web site: “In the initial years the Pig Stand pioneered several food items: Texas toast, deep-fried onion rings, and the country-fried steak sandwich. Not only was the Pig Stand the first restaurant to offer curb and drive-through service, it also was among the first to use fluorescent lighting, neon signs, and air conditioning.” The current owner of this location, Mary Ann Hill, started as a waitress here at age 18 in 1967. #backstory (Taken with Instagram at Pig Stand)

Farther north on Broadway Street: San Antonio’s Pig Stand restaurant, one of only a handful left in the chain. (Some 130 restaurants opened in the 1920s-30s.) From the Web site: “In the initial years the Pig Stand pioneered several food items: Texas toast, deep-fried onion rings, and the country-fried steak sandwich. Not only was the Pig Stand the first restaurant to offer curb and drive-through service, it also was among the first to use fluorescent lighting, neon signs, and air conditioning.” The current owner of this location, Mary Ann Hill, started as a waitress here at age 18 in 1967. #backstory (Taken with Instagram at Pig Stand)

I’ve long been a fan of artist Jean Shin; she’s turned discarded objects into really cool artwork. (We’ve featured some of her work on the Unconsumption Tumblr.) Here, I’m standing in front of one of her broken umbrella sculptures, in a private collection in Houston. (Taken with Instagram at Houston, Texas)

I’ve long been a fan of artist Jean Shin; she’s turned discarded objects into really cool artwork. (We’ve featured some of her work on the Unconsumption Tumblr.) Here, I’m standing in front of one of her broken umbrella sculptures, in a private collection in Houston. (Taken with Instagram at Houston, Texas)