Posts tagged Houston

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 
I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!
This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.
(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock) 
Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here. 

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 

I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!

This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.

(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock

Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

In landmark art preservation news: 

It’s hard to miss the 70-foot-tall blue saxophone as you drive down Richmond Avenue [in Houston].
Its name is Smokesax, and it has been at that location on 6025 Richmond for the past 20 years. But Wednesday, the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art, a local folk art organization [mentioned previously here], announced it is going to acquire the oversize horn, which is made out of car parts, oil field pipes and a surfboard, as well as an entire Volkswagen Beetle that forms the U-joint at its base.
The big brass was built by legendary Texas artist Bob Wade as a special installation for Billy Blues Bar & Grill. It was fully restored three years ago, and the current property owners, Kensinger Properties Ltd., said they wanted the Orange Show to ensure the piece would be preserved for future generations. 
The saxophone will be removed from its current location at 10 a.m. on Feb. 28. The process to remove the massive piece will take a full day. Then, Smokesax will begin its 13-mile journey from Richmond Avenue to Munger Street. Artist Bob Wade will be overseeing the entire removal and transportation. Once at the Orange Show, it will be housed in the organization’s warehouse until an exact location has been chosen for permanent display.

(via Orange Show Center for Visionary Art to acquire Smokesax - Houston Business Journal)

In landmark art preservation news: 

It’s hard to miss the 70-foot-tall blue saxophone as you drive down Richmond Avenue [in Houston].

Its name is Smokesax, and it has been at that location on 6025 Richmond for the past 20 years. But Wednesday, the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art, a local folk art organization [mentioned previously here], announced it is going to acquire the oversize horn, which is made out of car parts, oil field pipes and a surfboard, as well as an entire Volkswagen Beetle that forms the U-joint at its base.

The big brass was built by legendary Texas artist Bob Wade as a special installation for Billy Blues Bar & Grill. It was fully restored three years ago, and the current property owners, Kensinger Properties Ltd., said they wanted the Orange Show to ensure the piece would be preserved for future generations.

The saxophone will be removed from its current location at 10 a.m. on Feb. 28. The process to remove the massive piece will take a full day. Then, Smokesax will begin its 13-mile journey from Richmond Avenue to Munger Street. Artist Bob Wade will be overseeing the entire removal and transportation. Once at the Orange Show, it will be housed in the organization’s warehouse until an exact location has been chosen for permanent display.

(via Orange Show Center for Visionary Art to acquire Smokesax - Houston Business Journal)

Missing today’s Houston Social Media Week #Instacrawl. Instead, I’m hanging out with great City of Houston staff and talented Houston-area students who are interested in learning more about recycling. We’re judging students’ work in using salvaged materials to decorate recycling carts. Love this one covered in plastic bottles and cardboard. Not a typical Saturday, but a good one!

Missing today’s Houston Social Media Week #Instacrawl. Instead, I’m hanging out with great City of Houston staff and talented Houston-area students who are interested in learning more about recycling. We’re judging students’ work in using salvaged materials to decorate recycling carts. Love this one covered in plastic bottles and cardboard. Not a typical Saturday, but a good one!

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

By tomorrow afternoon (well, actually, 12:35 p.m. Central tomorrow), if all goes according to plan (not my plan, mind you, but the property owner’s plan), the Ben Milam Hotel in downtown Houston will be reduced to a big pile of rubble. (Think dynamite + implosion.) The 10-story brick hotel opened in the 1920s to house travelers who visited Houston via Union Station (which sits across the street and now is a part of Minute Maid Park, the Houston Astros’ home field). When the building goes down tomorrow, so will two of Houston’s few remaining ghost signs. I’m posting this photo as kind of a memorial to a piece of Houston history, I suppose. RIP, Ben Milam. (posted via Instagram at Inn at the Ballpark)

Old Styrofoam packing peanuts = new garland for City of Houston’s “Holiday Trees: Artistically Upcycled” exhibit.

Old Styrofoam packing peanuts = new garland for City of Houston’s “Holiday Trees: Artistically Upcycled” exhibit.

I’ve long been a fan of artist Jean Shin; she’s turned discarded objects into really cool artwork. (We’ve featured some of her work on the Unconsumption Tumblr.) Here, I’m standing in front of one of her broken umbrella sculptures, in a private collection in Houston. (Taken with Instagram at Houston, Texas)

I’ve long been a fan of artist Jean Shin; she’s turned discarded objects into really cool artwork. (We’ve featured some of her work on the Unconsumption Tumblr.) Here, I’m standing in front of one of her broken umbrella sculptures, in a private collection in Houston. (Taken with Instagram at Houston, Texas)

Via unconsumption:

The Houston artistic team of Dan Havel and Dean Ruck is at it again. (Previous mentions here and here.) Thanks to their handiwork, another old bungalow slated for demolition is being transformed into architectural artwork.
The public art project, which Havel and Ruck designed to function as a stage, is a temporary centerpiece in a new pocket park in Houston’s Fifth Ward, a neighborhood developed in the late 1800s. The Fifth Ward went into decline in the 1970s; in recent years, the area’s been undergoing redevelopment and revitalization. [Side note: Former residents include Congresswoman Barbara Jordan and musician Arnett Cobb.]
Photo above via Fifth Ward Jam - Houston Arts Alliance. 
Pre-deconstruction photo below (by Havel Ruck Projects) via Swamplot.com. 

For additional photos and information, see this Swamplot post. 

Houston!

Via unconsumption:

The Houston artistic team of Dan Havel and Dean Ruck is at it again. (Previous mentions here and here.) Thanks to their handiwork, another old bungalow slated for demolition is being transformed into architectural artwork.

The public art project, which Havel and Ruck designed to function as a stage, is a temporary centerpiece in a new pocket park in Houston’s Fifth Ward, a neighborhood developed in the late 1800s. The Fifth Ward went into decline in the 1970s; in recent years, the area’s been undergoing redevelopment and revitalization. [Side note: Former residents include Congresswoman Barbara Jordan and musician Arnett Cobb.]

Photo above via Fifth Ward Jam - Houston Arts Alliance

Pre-deconstruction photo below (by Havel Ruck Projects) via Swamplot.com

For additional photos and information, see this Swamplot post

Houston!

I love this vintage sign. The building — the old drug store — was shuttered several years ago. If you look through the building’s front windows, you can see merchandise inside, scattered on shelves, countertops, and atop the soda fountain. Did the former occupant leave in a hurry, and never return? A mystery.
(Taken with Instagram at 2119 Washington Avenue, in Houston)

I love this vintage sign. The building — the old drug store — was shuttered several years ago. If you look through the building’s front windows, you can see merchandise inside, scattered on shelves, countertops, and atop the soda fountain. Did the former occupant leave in a hurry, and never return? A mystery.

(Taken with Instagram at 2119 Washington Avenue, in Houston)

This vacant industrial building has not only a #ghostsign on it, but a yellow coat hanging from one of its windows.  #awesome (Taken with instagram)
Subsequent note: In recent years, at least one club has operated out of the building (which could help explain the presence of the coat!). The warehouse is located at 2001 Commerce Street — within shouting distance of Minute Maid Park — east of downtown Houston.
Thanks to a Google search, I now know that Graybar Electric Company was formerly housed in the building. The company’s old logos jibe with the ghost sign’s faded paint. See history.graybar.com/1942-1964.php and history.graybar.com.

This vacant industrial building has not only a #ghostsign on it, but a yellow coat hanging from one of its windows. #awesome (Taken with instagram)

Subsequent note: In recent years, at least one club has operated out of the building (which could help explain the presence of the coat!). The warehouse is located at 2001 Commerce Street — within shouting distance of Minute Maid Park — east of downtown Houston.

Thanks to a Google search, I now know that Graybar Electric Company was formerly housed in the building. The company’s old logos jibe with the ghost sign’s faded paint. See history.graybar.com/1942-1964.php and history.graybar.com.

David Eagleman and Mysteries of the Brain : The New Yorker

What a brush with death taught David Eagleman about the mysteries of time and the brain.

A fascinating read, by Burkhard Bilger.

When David Eagleman was eight years old, he fell off a roof and kept on falling. Or so it seemed at the time. His family was living outside Albuquerque, in the foothills of the Sandia Mountains. There were only a few other houses around, scattered among the bunchgrass and the cholla cactus, and a new construction site was the Eagleman boys’ idea of a perfect playground. David and his older brother, Joel, had ridden their dirt bikes to a half-finished adobe house about a quarter of a mile away. When they’d explored the rooms below, David scrambled up a wooden ladder to the roof. He stood there for a few minutes taking in the view—west across desert and subdivision to the city rising in the distance—then walked over the newly laid tar paper to a ledge above the living room. “It looked stiff,” he told me recently. “So I stepped onto the edge of it.”

In the years since, Eagleman has collected hundreds of stories like his, and they almost all share the same quality: in life-threatening situations, time seems to slow down. He remembers the feeling clearly, he says. His body stumbles forward as the tar paper tears free at his feet. His hands stretch toward the ledge, but it’s out of reach. The brick floor floats upward—some shiny nails are scattered across it—as his body rotates weightlessly above the ground. It’s a moment of absolute calm and eerie mental acuity. But the thing he remembers best is the thought that struck him in midair: this must be how Alice felt when she was tumbling down the rabbit hole.

Read the rest here.

Meeting a friend for brunch on the east side of town gave me good reason to drive around the area east of downtown Houston (east of Minute Maid Park, for baseball fans!). I wish I knew the back story behind this building, which appears to be empty, and its ghost signs.
Among the words I can make out are “No dust. No dirt.” And: “5 ¢.” “Metro.” Odd combo. 
(Taken with instagram, with no filter.)

Meeting a friend for brunch on the east side of town gave me good reason to drive around the area east of downtown Houston (east of Minute Maid Park, for baseball fans!). I wish I knew the back story behind this building, which appears to be empty, and its ghost signs.

Among the words I can make out are “No dust. No dirt.” And: “5 ¢.” “Metro.” Odd combo. 

(Taken with instagram, with no filter.)

At last, pleased to add this pic to my ghost sign series! … Had time today to drive by this building — the former Waddell House Furnishing Co. building — before I leave this side of Houston. Sadly, it’s a disused building. What future does it have?
Bonus: captured a bird in flight!
(Taken with instagram, with gotham filter.)

At last, pleased to add this pic to my ghost sign series! … Had time today to drive by this building — the former Waddell House Furnishing Co. building — before I leave this side of Houston. Sadly, it’s a disused building. What future does it have?

Bonus: captured a bird in flight!

(Taken with instagram, with gotham filter.)