Posts tagged Frank Lloyd Wright

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright made it easy for the owners of his Houston home to take a dip in their swimming pool:
His design for the bathroom featured the narrow vertical opening pictured above — a door that swings out over the pool’s edge!
Seeing the house on Sunday was quite a treat; additional photos (and notes) from my visit can be found here.  
During the visit, we learned Mr. Wright never visited the site, and he didn’t envision the house being air conditioned — he thought natural ventilation would be adequate. The original owner who commissioned Wright (in 1954) to design the home insisted that AC be included. Wright complied; the design solution involved the placement of air registers in the home’s concrete floors.
In addition, we learned the current owner bought the house in 1991, after the New York Times ran this story — Houston Journal - A House With a History May Not Have a Future - NYTimes.com. From 1991-95, the owner renovated the house, removing up to six layers of paint (in shades of pink and white) in some areas, and expanded it, adding some 7,000+ square feet of space. In the living room, ceiling tiles were removed, exposing the angled ceiling, and a banquette and other furniture was built from specs found in the home’s original plans.
Let’s hope that future owners are as good stewards of the home’s architectural heritage as the current one.
(Background about the house and my visit here, in my last post.)

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright made it easy for the owners of his Houston home to take a dip in their swimming pool:

His design for the bathroom featured the narrow vertical opening pictured above — a door that swings out over the pool’s edge!

Seeing the house on Sunday was quite a treat; additional photos (and notes) from my visit can be found here.  

During the visit, we learned Mr. Wright never visited the site, and he didn’t envision the house being air conditioned — he thought natural ventilation would be adequate. The original owner who commissioned Wright (in 1954) to design the home insisted that AC be included. Wright complied; the design solution involved the placement of air registers in the home’s concrete floors.

In addition, we learned the current owner bought the house in 1991, after the New York Times ran this story — Houston Journal - A House With a History May Not Have a Future - NYTimes.com. From 1991-95, the owner renovated the house, removing up to six layers of paint (in shades of pink and white) in some areas, and expanded it, adding some 7,000+ square feet of space. In the living room, ceiling tiles were removed, exposing the angled ceiling, and a banquette and other furniture was built from specs found in the home’s original plans.

Let’s hope that future owners are as good stewards of the home’s architectural heritage as the current one.

(Background about the house and my visit here, in my last post.)

Wright stuff:
I’m excited to be part of a small group visiting Frank Lloyd Wright’s one contribution to architecture in the city of Houston — a private residence located in the Memorial area.
Among the few stories I’ve found online about the house (designed in 1954) is this New York Times piece from 1991: Houston Journal - A House With a History May Not Have a Future - NYTimes.com. Even then, almost 20 years ago, the house was threatened by possible demolition. Since then, from what I’ve been told, significant modifications, including an addition (designed by Kirksey), have been made to the house.
I like this, from the NYT: 

Mr. Thaxton [original owner who commissioned Wright] said it cost $125,000 to build the house, an astronomical sum at the time. The amount included Wright’s $25,000 fee. “You didn’t work with Mr. Wright,” Mr. Thaxton said. “You presented Mr. Wright with a piece of property.”

The house is owner-occupied, so we don’t know if we’ll be allowed to take photos today. Will take a few, if it’s okay.
Related: Previous posts about the preservation and maintenance of Wright-designed properties elsewhere.

Wright stuff:

I’m excited to be part of a small group visiting Frank Lloyd Wright’s one contribution to architecture in the city of Houston — a private residence located in the Memorial area.

Among the few stories I’ve found online about the house (designed in 1954) is this New York Times piece from 1991: Houston Journal - A House With a History May Not Have a Future - NYTimes.com. Even then, almost 20 years ago, the house was threatened by possible demolition. Since then, from what I’ve been told, significant modifications, including an addition (designed by Kirksey), have been made to the house.

I like this, from the NYT:

Mr. Thaxton [original owner who commissioned Wright] said it cost $125,000 to build the house, an astronomical sum at the time. The amount included Wright’s $25,000 fee. “You didn’t work with Mr. Wright,” Mr. Thaxton said. “You presented Mr. Wright with a piece of property.”

The house is owner-occupied, so we don’t know if we’ll be allowed to take photos today. Will take a few, if it’s okay.

Related: Previous posts about the preservation and maintenance of Wright-designed properties elsewhere.

Wright matters:
Dramatic, historic and prices slashed, yet no buyers are biting - chicagotribune.com
In Los Angeles, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House and La Miniatura  remain on the market, despite significant price reductions/buyer incentives. Begs the architectural stewardship question: Who  is willing and able to take care of these historic homes?
[hat tip to @ChiArchitecture]
Related: June 2009 post.

Wright matters:

Dramatic, historic and prices slashed, yet no buyers are biting - chicagotribune.com

In Los Angeles, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House and La Miniatura remain on the market, despite significant price reductions/buyer incentives. Begs the architectural stewardship question: Who is willing and able to take care of these historic homes?

[hat tip to @ChiArchitecture]

Related: June 2009 post.

Wright onsite:

Spend two nights in the nature preserve housing Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater; tour & dine at FW.

Details: http://bit.ly/ZE46d.

Isn’t it a beautiful setting in which to enjoy many of life’s pleasures — nature, architecture, art, food, the company of like-minded individuals, etc. — and for encouraging introspection?

(Photo by Pablo Sanchez, used under a creative commons license)

More Wright stuff:
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House, a Los Feliz hilltop masterpiece composed of patterned and smooth concrete blocks that has been mightily threatened by man and Mother Nature, is being offered for sale at $15 million by the private foundation that has been restoring it.
LATimes story: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-ennis-house19-2009jun19,0,5217667.story

More Wright stuff:

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House, a Los Feliz hilltop masterpiece composed of patterned and smooth concrete blocks that has been mightily threatened by man and Mother Nature, is being offered for sale at $15 million by the private foundation that has been restoring it.

LATimes story: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-ennis-house19-2009jun19,0,5217667.story

Buffalo’s Wright stuff:
The Martin Complex.
Following a 12-year restoration, Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1905 house for Buffalo’s Martin family and new neighboring visitor center (designed by Toshiko Mori) make for a fine destination in upstate NY. 
Wall Street Journal story
http://www.darwinmartinhouse.org/

Buffalo’s Wright stuff:

The Martin Complex.

Following a 12-year restoration, Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1905 house for Buffalo’s Martin family and new neighboring visitor center (designed by Toshiko Mori) make for a fine destination in upstate NY. 

Wall Street Journal story

http://www.darwinmartinhouse.org/

Wright stuff:
Seems fitting that the work of master designer Frank Lloyd Wright, father of the creator of Lincoln Logs, should be immortalized in the form of LEGOs, per wired.com. Special-edition architecture LEGO sets will showcase FLW’s Fallingwater and the Guggenheim Museum.

Wright stuff:

Seems fitting that the work of master designer Frank Lloyd Wright, father of the creator of Lincoln Logs, should be immortalized in the form of LEGOs, per wired.com. Special-edition architecture LEGO sets will showcase FLW’s Fallingwater and the Guggenheim Museum.

Wright stuff:
I want: Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1955 Fawcett Ranch House in California. It *is* for sale.
The property’s sales site is worth a look, especially the slide shows: http://www.fawcetthouse.com/

Wright stuff:

I want: Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1955 Fawcett Ranch House in California. It *is* for sale.

The property’s sales site is worth a look, especially the slide shows: http://www.fawcetthouse.com/