Posts tagged DIY

If you’re going to give someone cash as a gift, here’s a creative twist: Fold the currency into some interesting shape(s).  
To make this star: 
I (mollyblock) used this tutorial — posted on YouTube by Sweetfire Creations — as a guide for folding bills into a neat star shape that looks pretty good from either side. You can see the other side of my star here.
All that’s needed are five bills — the crisper, the better — and a little time and patience.
In case you’re wondering: These stars do look nice hanging as ornaments!
(If you’re a fan of altered currency origami and/or art, find other examples here.)

If you’re going to give someone cash as a gift, here’s a creative twist: Fold the currency into some interesting shape(s).  

To make this star: 

I (mollyblock) used this tutorial — posted on YouTube by Sweetfire Creations — as a guide for folding bills into a neat star shape that looks pretty good from either side. You can see the other side of my star here.

All that’s needed are five bills — the crisper, the better — and a little time and patience.

In case you’re wondering: These stars do look nice hanging as ornaments!

(If you’re a fan of altered currency origami and/or art, find other examples here.)

Old Styrofoam packing peanuts = new garland for City of Houston’s “Holiday Trees: Artistically Upcycled” exhibit.

Old Styrofoam packing peanuts = new garland for City of Houston’s “Holiday Trees: Artistically Upcycled” exhibit.

unconsumption:

To add to our posts about libraries, other book-related matters, and wine-related repurposing, there’s this:
An obsolete card catalog repurposed as a minibar.
Need we say more?!
(photo via The Sugar Monster on Flickr)

Today, in “things I love.”

unconsumption:

To add to our posts about libraries, other book-related matters, and wine-related repurposing, there’s this:

An obsolete card catalog repurposed as a minibar.

Need we say more?!

(photo via The Sugar Monster on Flickr)

Today, in “things I love.”

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programming to say there’s been a breakthrough in the kitchen of Chez Molly: The spinach smoothie recipe has been tweaked to perfection (for now).  (Taken with Instagram at Houston, TX)
Green smoothie
1/4 c cold water 1/2 c unsweetened vanilla almond milk3 heaping tablespoons plain, low-fat Greek yogurt 1 heaping tablespoon smooth, natural peanut butter4 slices banana, frozen (approximately 2” in length)3 or more cups spinach leaves, loosely packed (approximately 4 cups of the fresh “baby spinach” work well) 
Blend (in a food processor or blender) and enjoy. 
Optional, before blending: Add everything but the spinach to a food processor bowl or blender, then place in the freezer for several minutes (until ice forms on the top of the liquid) while you cut off the spinach stems. Makes a thicker smoothie.
Servings: 1, approximately 12 oz., depending on spinach volume
Nutritional info, estimated: 210 calories; 9.5g fat; 17g carbs; 5.5g dietary fiber; 6g sugar; 13g protein. [Please correct me if these figures seem off. Note: Figures will vary, depending on banana size and peanut butter and yogurt used.]

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programming to say there’s been a breakthrough in the kitchen of Chez Molly: The spinach smoothie recipe has been tweaked to perfection (for now). (Taken with Instagram at Houston, TX)

Green smoothie

1/4 c cold water 
1/2 c unsweetened vanilla almond milk
3 heaping tablespoons plain, low-fat Greek yogurt 
1 heaping tablespoon smooth, natural peanut butter
4 slices banana, frozen (approximately 2” in length)
3 or more cups spinach leaves, loosely packed (approximately 4 cups of the fresh “baby spinach” work well) 

Blend (in a food processor or blender) and enjoy. 

Optional, before blending: Add everything but the spinach to a food processor bowl or blender, then place in the freezer for several minutes (until ice forms on the top of the liquid) while you cut off the spinach stems. Makes a thicker smoothie.

Servings: 1, approximately 12 oz., depending on spinach volume

Nutritional info, estimated: 210 calories; 9.5g fat; 17g carbs; 5.5g dietary fiber; 6g sugar; 13g protein. [Please correct me if these figures seem off. Note: Figures will vary, depending on banana size and peanut butter and yogurt used.]

More creative new uses for old books:
Make table runners from the pages of unwanted books, e.g., books damaged beyond repair.
(via BHG)

More creative new uses for old books:

Make table runners from the pages of unwanted books, e.g., books damaged beyond repair.

(via BHG)

Over the past year, I’ve found Pinterest to be quite useful for two primary reasons:
Discovery of recipes (see my “food finds” Pinterest board here).
Discovery of items made from repurposed materials (see my “creative reuse — Unconsumption ideas” Pinterest board here). For several months, my personal Pinterest activity pretty much centered on finding examples of repurposing to share on the Unconsumption Tumblr. (As many of you know, Unconsumption is an inspiring, mindful consumer behavior-oriented project with which I’m involved). Later, in April, after continuing to come across so many reuse-related finds on Pinterest, I launched a separate Pinterest page for Unconsumption (to which I pin many more interesting pins than those I share on my personal Pinterest page!). Needless to say, Pinterest is a great vehicle for expanding the Unconsumption brand. I mean, look at the volume of items — pinned by other Pinterest users — from the Unconsumption blog! 
Anyway, it’s thanks to Melody Kramer’s food-focused Pinterest board that I discovered, this morning, the recipe for this incredibly tasty, highly aromatic turmeric chicken dish, and made it tonight for dinner.
I followed Beth’s (of the Budget Bytes blog) recipe, except I used only half a can of coconut milk; used ground red pepper instead of crushed (which I didn’t have); and I didn’t make rice; I simply ate the chicken in the sauce. (A note about the “no rice” thing: I’m trying to reduce my consumption of grains, including rice; see Wheat Belly blog and William Davis’s book by the same name.)
If you love Indian food, and easy-to-make, one-dish cooking, I highly, highly recommend you make this dish. 
For the recipe, which includes onion, ginger, garlic, turmeric, cumin, cinnamon, red pepper, a bay leaf, chicken, and cans of diced tomatoes and coconut milk (cilantro optional), see Budget Bytes.
For variety, I think you could add cauliflower, red bell pepper, chick peas, and/or cashew or almond pieces to the dish. And vegetarians could leave out the chicken altogether.
What else could be added? Probably many other things I haven’t thought of!
If you make a turmeric dish, let me know what you put in it. 

Over the past year, I’ve found Pinterest to be quite useful for two primary reasons:

  1. Discovery of recipes (see my “food finds” Pinterest board here).
  2. Discovery of items made from repurposed materials (see my “creative reuse — Unconsumption ideas” Pinterest board here). For several months, my personal Pinterest activity pretty much centered on finding examples of repurposing to share on the Unconsumption Tumblr. (As many of you know, Unconsumption is an inspiring, mindful consumer behavior-oriented project with which I’m involved). Later, in April, after continuing to come across so many reuse-related finds on Pinterest, I launched a separate Pinterest page for Unconsumption (to which I pin many more interesting pins than those I share on my personal Pinterest page!). Needless to say, Pinterest is a great vehicle for expanding the Unconsumption brand. I mean, look at the volume of items — pinned by other Pinterest users — from the Unconsumption blog! 

Anyway, it’s thanks to Melody Kramer’s food-focused Pinterest board that I discovered, this morning, the recipe for this incredibly tasty, highly aromatic turmeric chicken dish, and made it tonight for dinner.

I followed Beth’s (of the Budget Bytes blog) recipe, except I used only half a can of coconut milk; used ground red pepper instead of crushed (which I didn’t have); and I didn’t make rice; I simply ate the chicken in the sauce. (A note about the “no rice” thing: I’m trying to reduce my consumption of grains, including rice; see Wheat Belly blog and William Davis’s book by the same name.)

If you love Indian food, and easy-to-make, one-dish cooking, I highly, highly recommend you make this dish. 

For the recipe, which includes onion, ginger, garlic, turmeric, cumin, cinnamon, red pepper, a bay leaf, chicken, and cans of diced tomatoes and coconut milk (cilantro optional), see Budget Bytes.

For variety, I think you could add cauliflower, red bell pepper, chick peas, and/or cashew or almond pieces to the dish. And vegetarians could leave out the chicken altogether.

What else could be added? Probably many other things I haven’t thought of!

If you make a turmeric dish, let me know what you put in it. 

unconsumption:

Here’s another kitchen-related reuse idea: Use a small dresser as an island in the kitchen. It’s an easy way to increase your storage and work space.
(Via Small Place Style: Ideas for the Tiny Kitchen; spotted on Pinterest.)
Note: This one’s on wheels so it’s mobile. 

unconsumption:

Here’s another kitchen-related reuse idea: Use a small dresser as an island in the kitchen. It’s an easy way to increase your storage and work space.

(Via Small Place Style: Ideas for the Tiny Kitchen; spotted on Pinterest.)

Note: This one’s on wheels so it’s mobile. 

DIY project: Decorate a candle holder with sea glass.

Choose two glass vases or tumblers of the same height but different diameters. Place the smaller one inside the larger one; add a votive. Fill the space between the containers with clear or colored sea glass.

(via bhg.com)
Earlier posts on sea glass here.

DIY project: Decorate a candle holder with sea glass.

Choose two glass vases or tumblers of the same height but different diameters. Place the smaller one inside the larger one; add a votive. Fill the space between the containers with clear or colored sea glass.

(via bhg.com)

Earlier posts on sea glass here.

unconsumption:

Have you wrapped gifts in cloth, perhaps in scarves or other fabric items that are reusable? (It’s like giving the recipient a second gift!)

For some beautiful cloth-wrapping ideas, watch this how-to video demonstrating several furoshiki wrapping variations. 

For other furoshiki folding patterns, check out the diagram in the Unconsumption archive post here.

[The video (by RecycleNow) also may be viewed here. Thanks, Green Thing — another great find!]

File under: Things I love.

How-to: Make a “paper tree” in five easy steps

This project was inspired by two things: 1.) A neat “printed paper pine” item from Anthropologie, and 2.) my discovery, in the attic of my parents’ house, of an assortment of vintage sheet music — mainly trumpet and saxophone parts from the 1950s-1970s (that hadn’t been touched since the 1970s) when my father played in a band. 

Materials needed:

  • One chopstick
  • Something into which the chopstick can be anchored, like a scrap piece of wood, so the stick stands vertically (I upcycled an old plastic reel-to-reel tape spool as a base)
  • Several pages of printed sheet music, pages from a discarded book (or book you’ll no longer read), old holiday cards, or pages from magazines or catalogs
  • A piece of cardboard, roughly 1.5’x2’ in size 

Tools: 

  • Pinking shears, or something else that provides a decorative edge
  • Scissors
  • An ice pick, or other hole-punching device
  • Optional: Glue, small nail, hammer

Estimated time for completion: 

  • A couple of hours, though you probably can multi-task (read blogs, like I did, or watch TV) while working. 

Steps:

  1. Using pinking shears, or another cutting tool, cut the music (or other paper pieces) into squares. I cut my largest square approximately 5” x 5”, and smallest 1” x 1”. As I went along, I didn’t measure the pieces, but estimated the size based on that of the squares I’d just cut. For one tree, I used 40 paper squares. 
  2. Next, use scissors to cut the cardboard into small squares to add as spacers between the paper squares. The cardboard squares should be considerably smaller than the paper squares — that’ll help make the cardboard less visible. (I used a piece of recycled cardboard that held a case of cat food — it’s thinner and less rigid than some cardboard which made it easier to cut, I think.) Cut out the same number of cardboard squares as you have paper squares. 
  3. Poke holes in the center of the paper and cardboard squares. With an ice pick, I was able to punch holes through several squares at the same time. (Your mileage may vary.)
  4. Next, place your chopstick in whatever object you have handy to use as a base. You may want to nail or glue the chopstick into/onto your object. (I didn’t need to — my chopstick fits pretty snugly into my base.) 
  5. Now place the cardboard and paper squares onto the chopstick, pushing them down from the chopstick’s tapered end. Start with your largest square of cardboard, then add your largest piece of music on top of it. Continue stacking the cardboard and paper squares, keeping an eye on how your “tree” is shaping up. Hopefully, it’s a nice cone shape. 

As your layering of squares nears the top of the chopstick, stop at whatever point you want to. You could put a dot of glue on the topmost cardboard piece and paper square, to hold them in place. (I’d like to take the tree apart after the holidays — to store everything flat in a box — so I didn’t add glue.) Also, I left my chopstick top bare because I like the minimal look of it. You may want to “top” your tree with something.  

That’s it. Place your tree on a table, and enjoy!  

Note: This project carries a stamp of approval from Veto, my feline quality control officer.

The Uncollection: Looking for DIY/Crafty Creators To Spotlight

unconsumption:

A quick note about the Uncollection project that’s been gradually unfolding here on the Unconsumption Tumblr.

As many of you know, we’ve invited a series of our favorite crafty creators to reuse our Mr. Cart Logo in original projects — rebranding existing stuff, as an experiment subverting the whole “brand” concept to give new value to old things. Lately our contributors’ efforts have been recognized by BoingBoing, Swiss Miss, FastCompany.com, and The Etsy Blog.

We have more Uncollection pieces in the works, but now is as good a time as any to say that we’re also looking for even more creators to work with. If that’s you, please get in touch — read on for details including contact info.

Read More

Via gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Plantbombing!

Yarnbombing — or the cozying up of the urban landscape with random acts of gorgeous knitting — has already been seen popping up in a number of cities. Now San Francisco-based urban knitter and guerilla gardeners Heather Powazek Champ and Derek Powazek have publicly come out with yarn bombing’s next evolution: planting low-maintenance species in beautifully hand-knitted yarn pockets all over their fair city.
Inspired after this year’s International Yarn Bombing Day, the husband and wife pair call their project “Plantbombing,” and it combines Heather’s love of “urban knitting” and Derek’s skill at gardening. Using yarn, a bit of soil, and some hardy plants, the result is a hands-off, smile-inducing work of art. 
For those of you who want to try making your own plant pockets, Heather’s site provides the instructions to get started.

(via Plantbombing: Colorful Yarn-Wrapped Plants Soften Up The City : TreeHugger)

Today, in “things I love.”

Via gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Plantbombing!

Yarnbombing — or the cozying up of the urban landscape with random acts of gorgeous knitting — has already been seen popping up in a number of cities. Now San Francisco-based urban knitter and guerilla gardeners Heather Powazek Champ and Derek Powazek have publicly come out with yarn bombing’s next evolution: planting low-maintenance species in beautifully hand-knitted yarn pockets all over their fair city.

Inspired after this year’s International Yarn Bombing Day, the husband and wife pair call their project “Plantbombing,” and it combines Heather’s love of “urban knitting” and Derek’s skill at gardening. Using yarn, a bit of soil, and some hardy plants, the result is a hands-off, smile-inducing work of art. 

For those of you who want to try making your own plant pockets, Heather’s site provides the instructions to get started.

(via Plantbombing: Colorful Yarn-Wrapped Plants Soften Up The City : TreeHugger)

Today, in “things I love.”