wnyc:

Thanks to a new city law, all construction sites must now have a “viewing panel” that lets you peek in and see what’s going on. We explained the law on the Brian Lehrer Show blog, and asked you to snap a picture through that little diamond-shaped peephole. Now, here are our favorite of your photos.
-Jody, BL Show-

Gotta say I like this.

wnyc:

Thanks to a new city law, all construction sites must now have a “viewing panel” that lets you peek in and see what’s going on. We explained the law on the Brian Lehrer Show blog, and asked you to snap a picture through that little diamond-shaped peephole. Now, here are our favorite of your photos.

-Jody, BL Show-

Gotta say I like this.

Bluebonnets — on a street corner in central Houston — *not* in a spot where you’d expect to see Texas wildflowers growing. What a great sight! 
The street corner serves as a METRO bus stop.
[Photo snapped by yours truly (mollyblock) on my trusty iPhone 5 on April 17, 2014, and posted on Flickr here.]

Bluebonnets — on a street corner in central Houston — *not* in a spot where you’d expect to see Texas wildflowers growing. What a great sight! 

The street corner serves as a METRO bus stop.

[Photo snapped by yours truly (mollyblock) on my trusty iPhone 5 on April 17, 2014, and posted on Flickr here.]

tinypmsmatch:

Pantone 2725 color match. A Blue Bonnet flower. Spring is officially here in Texas!

Today’s spot o’ color: Bluebonnet blue. 

tinypmsmatch:

Pantone 2725 color match. A Blue Bonnet flower. Spring is officially here in Texas!

Today’s spot o’ color: Bluebonnet blue. 

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art: 
"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 
The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.
(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

Auto-reblog: Because every day is Earth day.
Also, there are some really cool pieces associated with Sculpture by the Sea in Australia (link above). 
Also: This.

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art:

"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 

The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.

(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

Auto-reblog: Because every day is Earth day.

Also, there are some really cool pieces associated with Sculpture by the Sea in Australia (link above). 

Also: This.

wesandersonpalettes:

Sam: Why do you always use binoculars?
Suzy: It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power.

Follow a new Tumblr that features stills of scenes from Wes Anderson films and highlights each scene’s color palette? Why not?
File under: Today’s spot o’ color.

wesandersonpalettes:

Sam: Why do you always use binoculars?

Suzy: It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power.

Follow a new Tumblr that features stills of scenes from Wes Anderson films and highlights each scene’s color palette? Why not?

File under: Today’s spot o’ color.

theatlantic:

A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.
Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]


Enjoyed reading this.

theatlantic:

A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.

Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]

Enjoyed reading this.

relativetoearth:

Jacqueline Lou Skaags- tiny penny oil paintings

More altered currency posts here

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 
I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!
This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.
(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock) 
Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here. 

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 

I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!

This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.

(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock

Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here

Bookshelf of the week, hands down.

pewinternet:

We have a new report out today, a typology of Americans’ engagement with public libraries. It caps off the past three years of research the Pew Research Center has produced on the topic of public libraries’ changing role in Americans’ lives and communities.

Some of the main findings:

  • Americans’ library habits do not exist in a vacuum: People’s connection—or lack of connection—with public libraries is part of their broader information and social landscape. As a rule, people who have extensive economic, social, technological, and cultural resources are also more likely to use and value libraries as part of those networks. 
  • Life stage and special circumstances are linked to increased library use and higher engagement with information: Deeper connections with public libraries are often associated with key life moments such as having a child, seeking a job, being a student, and going through a situation in which research and data can help inform a decision.
  • Technology users are generally library users: A common narrative is that Americans are turning away from libraries because of newer technology, but the data shows that most highly-engaged library users are also big technology users. 

Check out the full report on our website! And if you’re curious about the basic data, this earlier report summarizes the measures we used to explore Americans’ engagement with public libraries.

Interesting research. Proud to be an “information omnivore” (I think)! 

If you’re going to give someone cash as a gift, here’s a creative twist: Fold the currency into some interesting shape(s).  
To make this star: 
I (mollyblock) used this tutorial — posted on YouTube by Sweetfire Creations — as a guide for folding bills into a neat star shape that looks pretty good from either side. You can see the other side of my star here.
All that’s needed are five bills — the crisper, the better — and a little time and patience.
In case you’re wondering: These stars do look nice hanging as ornaments!
(If you’re a fan of altered currency origami and/or art, find other examples here.)

If you’re going to give someone cash as a gift, here’s a creative twist: Fold the currency into some interesting shape(s).  

To make this star: 

I (mollyblock) used this tutorial — posted on YouTube by Sweetfire Creations — as a guide for folding bills into a neat star shape that looks pretty good from either side. You can see the other side of my star here.

All that’s needed are five bills — the crisper, the better — and a little time and patience.

In case you’re wondering: These stars do look nice hanging as ornaments!

(If you’re a fan of altered currency origami and/or art, find other examples here.)

Whoa — we can now upload *previously* recorded video onto Instagram! So, here’s my first IG video: A six-second #neonporn clip from my brief visit to Seattle in June 2013. (Because nothing says “doughnuts” like a neon cowboy riding a neon horse, right?!) 🍩🐎

theatlantic:

I Know What You Did Last Errand

Here are some of the things that stores — physical, street-side stores — might know about you from your recent visit to them:
• your age • your gender • your mood as you travel through the store • how long you spend in each section of the store• which items you spend time looking at during your visit • how long you looked at an item before purchasing it • which of the store’s products you previously looked up on the store’s website • your purchase history with the store • the number of times you recently visited the store • the average time elapsed between your visits to the store
Read more. [Image: Shutterstock/Kzenon]

theatlantic:

I Know What You Did Last Errand

Here are some of the things that stores — physical, street-side stores — might know about you from your recent visit to them:

• your age
• your gender
• your mood as you travel through the store
• how long you spend in each section of the store
• which items you spend time looking at during your visit
• how long you looked at an item before purchasing it
• which of the store’s products you previously looked up on the store’s website
• your purchase history with the store
• the number of times you recently visited the store
• the average time elapsed between your visits to the store

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock/Kzenon]

cassel:

amyvernon:

THIS IS A CAT. DRESSED LIKE A SHARK. ON A ROOMBA. CHASING A DUCK.

cassel:

amyvernon:

THIS IS A CAT. DRESSED LIKE A SHARK. ON A ROOMBA. CHASING A DUCK.